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The Year of the Linux Everything Else

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Linux

The 2009 International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) just finished its annual flagship event in Las Vegas. Known as the biggest show in electronics, it’s covered by mainstream press and technology bloggers with relish. Keynotes, product announcements, parties, celebrities… CES has it all.

You’d think CES would be a good indicator of the major technology trends in electronics. But Linux at CES? That’s unlikely to show up in your RSS reader. Heard any your friends talk about how Linux is taking over CES? No? Me neither. But don’t get fooled. While Linux is nowhere at CES, Linux is everywhere at CES.

Linux itself didn’t have a booth at CES this past week and didn’t organize a high-powered, star-studded evening reception for all the Linux users at CES. If it had, the booth would be have been full of a mountain of consumer electronic devices debuting this past week. Here are just a few,

rest here




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