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Join the Linux revolution

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Linux

You have undoubtedly heard of Linux, and as a PCW reader it’s very likely you have tried it. Only a few years ago, Linux was something largely best left to the most technically minded, to those who liked to configure and tweak their operating system and liked the idea of free software.

That’s not true any more; you will find Linux on the latest mobile phones, on desktops, on laptops, netbooks, and on servers. Pretty much anyone who has switched on a computer before can now give it a try. Things have changed a great deal –­ for the better ­ – and will continue to change.

Maybe you tried Linux some years back and found it confusing or difficult; maybe you have never really considered Linux, making assumptions about who it is for or what it can do. You may be surprised at just how suitable it is. Having lower hardware requirements than Windows XP generally, and significantly lower than Vista, it can also breathe new life into an older computer.

Of course Linux is not for everybody, and in this feature we will look at Linux as it is today, how to install it, configure and update it, and how to get the most from this free and extremely versatile operating system.

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