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original content

This began as a list of original articles found on tuxmachines.org, either by me or someone else, but it has since morphed into a list of original articles found on tuxmachines.org and the articles I've had published elsewhere.

  1. Linux Tycoon: Design and Manage Your Own Distribution - March 31, 2012
  2. Ubuntu 12.04 Beta 2 Arrives for Testing - March 29, 2012
  3. GNOME 3.4 Released with Lots of Improvement - March 28, 2012
  4. Greg K-H Updates Tumbleweed Status - March 27, 2012
  5. LibreOffice 3.4.6 Released - March 22, 2012
  6. openSUSE 12.2 M2, Better Late than Never - March 21, 2012
  7. Mitchell Baker Says H.264 is About User Experience - March 19, 2012
  8. LibreOffice 3.5.1 Released with Fixes - March 18, 2012
  9. Mageia 2 Beta 2, Still No Live Images - March 16, 2012
  10. KDE Spark Tablet Renamed to Honor Classical Composer - March 15, 2012
  11. Final Debian 5 Update Released - March 13, 2012
  12. Arch Turns Ten - Mar 12, 2012
  13. Raspberry Pi Orders Now Being Accepted - Feb 29, 2012
  14. Upcoming GNOME 3.4 Previewed - Feb 28, 2012
  15. Fedora's Beefy Miracle Sizzling with Alpha 1 - Feb 28, 2012
  16. Amnesia, Scariest Game Ever, to Get Sequel - Feb 24, 2012
  17. Intel Joins TDF, Adds LibreOffice to AppUp Center - Feb 23, 2012
  18. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.7 to 5.8 Risk Report - Feb 21, 2012
  19. The Document Foundation Incorporated in Germany - Feb 20, 2012
  20. KDE Spark Tablet Pre-Order Registration Open - Feb 16, 2012
  21. LibreOffice 3.5 Released - Feb 14, 2012
  22. Debian GNU/Linux 5.0 Reaches End of Life - Feb 10, 2012
  23. Pardus Future Uncertain, Fork Probable - Feb 07, 2012
  24. PCLinuxOS 2012.2 Released - Feb 02, 2012
  25. openSUSE has a Dream - Jan 31, 2012
  26. Mandriva Bankruptcy Crisis Averted, For Now - Jan 30, 2012
  27. GhostBSD 2.5 - Now with an Easy Graphic Installer - Jan 26, 2012
  28. Gentoo-based Toorox Releases 01.2012 GNOME Edition - Jan 25, 2012
  29. Mandriva Decision Delayed Again - Jan 23, 2012
  30. Xfce's Early April Fool's Joke - Jan 20, 2012
  31. KDE 4.9 to get a New Widgets Explorer - Jan 19, 2012
  32. Meet Bodhi's Bulky Brother: Bloathi - Jan 18, 2012
  33. Mandriva Delays Bankruptcy Decision - Jan 17, 2012
  34. LibreOffice 3.4.5 Released - Jan 16, 2012
  35. Fedora Running Beefy Contest - Jan 13, 2012
  36. Mageia 2 Inches Along with Another Alpha - Jan 12, 2012
  37. Linux Mint 12 KDE Almost Ready - Jan 11, 2012
  38. Greg KH Posts Status of Kernel Tree - Jan 10, 2012
  39. Unused LibreOffice Code Expunged - Jan 9, 2012
  40. Is Mandriva Finished This Time? - Jan 5, 2012
  41. New aptosid Fork, siduction 11.1 Released - Jan 4, 2012
  42. Lefebvre Introduces GNOME 3 Fork - Jan 3, 2012
  43. Gentoo Gets New Year's Release - Jan 2, 2012










More in Tux Machines

Unsafe at any clock speed: Linux kernel security needs a rethink

The Linux kernel today faces an unprecedented safety crisis. Much like when Ralph Nader famously told the American public that their cars were "unsafe at any speed" back in 1965, numerous security developers told the 2016 Linux Security Summit in Toronto that the operating system needs a total rethink to keep it fit for purpose. No longer the niche concern of years past, Linux today underpins the server farms that run the cloud, more than a billion Android phones, and not to mention the coming tsunami of grossly insecure devices that will be hitched to the Internet of Things. Today's world runs on Linux, and the security of its kernel is a single point of failure that will affect the safety and well-being of almost every human being on the planet in one way or another. Read more

Linux Foundation and Linux

  • ONOS Hummingbird SDN release touts core control function improvements
    ON.Lab’s ONOS Project noted its eighth SDN platform release expands southbound and northbound protocol, legacy device support The telecommunications market’s choice of software-defined networking platforms continues to blossom, with the Open Networking Laboratory’s Open Network Operating System Project releasing its latest SDN platform variant under the “Hummingbird” tag.
  • OPNFV Heads Down Colorado Trail
    OPNFV today issued its third software release, ending the agonizing six-month period in which folks had to pronounce and spell Brahmaputra. (See OPNFV Issues Third Software Release.) This latest release continues the river theme but is sensibly named Colorado: It has other advantages as well, namely support for key features such as security, IPv6, service function chaining (SFC) testing, virtual private networks and more. In addition, Colorado is laying some key groundwork for what lies ahead as the industry comes to terms with the MANO (management and network orchestration) dilemma, says Heather Kirksey, Open Platform for NFV Project Inc. 's executive director.
  • The Linux State Of AMD's Zen x86 Memory Encryption
    With AMD's forthcoming Zen processors is support for some new memory encryption technologies that are of particular benefit for virtualized environments. I wrote about Linux patches for AMD memory encryption earlier this year while since then more information has come to light. At last month's Linux Security Summit, David Kaplan presented on these technologies coming with Zen; only today I had come across the slide deck for this presentation. The technologies come down to Secure Memory Encryption (SME) and Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV). SME provides memory encryption on a per-page-table basis using AMD's ARM-based security co-processor. AMD SME + SEV are designed against both user-access attacks and physical access attacks with a particular focus on VM / hypervisor security.
  • Improving Fuzzing Tools for More Efficient Kernel Testing
    Fuzz testing (or fuzzing) is a software testing technique that involves passing invalid or random data to a program and observing the results, such as crashes or other failures. Bamvor Jian Zhang of Huawei, who will be speaking at LinuxCon Europe, realized that existing fuzz testing tools -- such as trinity -- can generate random or boundary values for syscall parameters and inject them into the kernel, but they don’t validate whether the results of those syscalls are correct.
  • X.Org's GLAMOR 2D Performance Continues To Be Tuned
    While GLAMOR has already been around for a number of years as a means of providing generic X11 2D acceleration over OpenGL for the X.Org Server, it's a seemingly never-ending process to optimize its code-paths for best performance. More improvements are en route for making GLAMOR 2D faster, which should especially be helpful for Raspberry Pi users making use of the VC4 driver stack on this very slow-speed hardware. Benefits to the GLAMOR code in the X.Org Server obviously have the potential to benefit all users of this acceleration mechanism for code going into the xorg-server code-base as opposed to an individual GL driver, but for Raspberry Pi users in particular there is some efforts ongoing by Broadcom's Eric Anholt as well as Keith Packard's never-ending tinkering with the X Server code. GLAMOR continues to be used by default for all AMD GCN GPUs, Nouveau for the latest generations of GPU too, VC4 2D is only supported with GLAMOR, and optionally by other DDX drivers too.

Security News

  • Canonical Patches OpenSSL Regression in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, 14.04 LTS & 12.04 LTS
    After announcing a few days ago that a new, important OpenSSL update is available for all supported Ubuntu Linux operating systems, Canonical's Marc Deslauriers now informs the community about another patch to address a regression. The new security advisory (USN-3087-2) talks about a regression that was accidentally introduced along with the previous OpenSSL update (as detailed on USN-3087-1), which addressed no less than eleven (11) security vulnerabilities discovered upstream by the OpenSSL team.
  • Patch AGAIN: OpenSSL security fixes now need their own security fixes
  • Bangladesh Bank exposed to hackers by cheap switches, no firewall: Police
  • This is the Israeli company that can hack any iPhone and Android smartphone
    If Cellebrite sounds familiar, that’s because the name of this Israeli company came up during Apple’s standoff with the FBI over breaking iPhone encryption. The agency managed to crack the San Bernardino iPhone with the help of an undisclosed company. Many people believe it was Cellebrite that came to the rescue. Meanwhile, the company revealed that it could hack just about any modern smartphone, but refused to say whether its expertise is used by the police forces of repressive regimes.
  • Reproducible Builds: week 74 in Stretch cycle
  • East-West Encryption: The Next Security Frontier?
    Microsegmentation, a method to create secure, virtual connections in software-defined data centers (SDDCs), has already emerged as one of the primary reasons to embrace network virtualization (NV). But some vendors believe that East-West encryption of traffic inside the data center could be the next stop in data-center security. For example, VMware says it is looking at encrypting East-West traffic inside the data center, adding another layer of security to the SDDC. Why is that important? Today, most firewalls operate on the perimeter of the data center – either guarding or encrypting data leaving the data center for the WAN. And some security products may encrypt data at rest inside the data center. But encrypting the traffic in motion between servers inside the data center – known in the business as the East-West traffic – is not something that’s typically done.
  • DHS Offers Its Unsolicited 'Help' In Securing The Internet Of Things [Ed: In the UK, GCHQ meddles in the Surveillance of Things in the name of 'security' while at the same time, with Tories' consent, cracking PCs]
    It's generally agreed that the state of security for the Internet of Things runs from "abysmal" to "compromised during unboxing." The government -- despite no one asking it to -- is offering to help out… somehow. DHS Assistant Secretary for Cyber Policy Robert Silvers spoke at the Internet of Things forum, offering up a pile of words that indicates Silvers is pretty cool with the "cyber" part of his title... but not all that strong on the "policy" part.

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