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original content

This began as a list of original articles found on tuxmachines.org, either by me or someone else, but it has since morphed into a list of original articles found on tuxmachines.org and the articles I've had published elsewhere.

  1. Linux Tycoon: Design and Manage Your Own Distribution - March 31, 2012
  2. Ubuntu 12.04 Beta 2 Arrives for Testing - March 29, 2012
  3. GNOME 3.4 Released with Lots of Improvement - March 28, 2012
  4. Greg K-H Updates Tumbleweed Status - March 27, 2012
  5. LibreOffice 3.4.6 Released - March 22, 2012
  6. openSUSE 12.2 M2, Better Late than Never - March 21, 2012
  7. Mitchell Baker Says H.264 is About User Experience - March 19, 2012
  8. LibreOffice 3.5.1 Released with Fixes - March 18, 2012
  9. Mageia 2 Beta 2, Still No Live Images - March 16, 2012
  10. KDE Spark Tablet Renamed to Honor Classical Composer - March 15, 2012
  11. Final Debian 5 Update Released - March 13, 2012
  12. Arch Turns Ten - Mar 12, 2012
  13. Raspberry Pi Orders Now Being Accepted - Feb 29, 2012
  14. Upcoming GNOME 3.4 Previewed - Feb 28, 2012
  15. Fedora's Beefy Miracle Sizzling with Alpha 1 - Feb 28, 2012
  16. Amnesia, Scariest Game Ever, to Get Sequel - Feb 24, 2012
  17. Intel Joins TDF, Adds LibreOffice to AppUp Center - Feb 23, 2012
  18. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.7 to 5.8 Risk Report - Feb 21, 2012
  19. The Document Foundation Incorporated in Germany - Feb 20, 2012
  20. KDE Spark Tablet Pre-Order Registration Open - Feb 16, 2012
  21. LibreOffice 3.5 Released - Feb 14, 2012
  22. Debian GNU/Linux 5.0 Reaches End of Life - Feb 10, 2012
  23. Pardus Future Uncertain, Fork Probable - Feb 07, 2012
  24. PCLinuxOS 2012.2 Released - Feb 02, 2012
  25. openSUSE has a Dream - Jan 31, 2012
  26. Mandriva Bankruptcy Crisis Averted, For Now - Jan 30, 2012
  27. GhostBSD 2.5 - Now with an Easy Graphic Installer - Jan 26, 2012
  28. Gentoo-based Toorox Releases 01.2012 GNOME Edition - Jan 25, 2012
  29. Mandriva Decision Delayed Again - Jan 23, 2012
  30. Xfce's Early April Fool's Joke - Jan 20, 2012
  31. KDE 4.9 to get a New Widgets Explorer - Jan 19, 2012
  32. Meet Bodhi's Bulky Brother: Bloathi - Jan 18, 2012
  33. Mandriva Delays Bankruptcy Decision - Jan 17, 2012
  34. LibreOffice 3.4.5 Released - Jan 16, 2012
  35. Fedora Running Beefy Contest - Jan 13, 2012
  36. Mageia 2 Inches Along with Another Alpha - Jan 12, 2012
  37. Linux Mint 12 KDE Almost Ready - Jan 11, 2012
  38. Greg KH Posts Status of Kernel Tree - Jan 10, 2012
  39. Unused LibreOffice Code Expunged - Jan 9, 2012
  40. Is Mandriva Finished This Time? - Jan 5, 2012
  41. New aptosid Fork, siduction 11.1 Released - Jan 4, 2012
  42. Lefebvre Introduces GNOME 3 Fork - Jan 3, 2012
  43. Gentoo Gets New Year's Release - Jan 2, 2012










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Red Hat News/Leftovers

Cloudgizer: An introduction to a new open source web development tool

Cloudgizer is a free open source tool for building web applications. It combines the ease of scripting languages with the performance of C, helping manage the development effort and run-time resources for cloud applications. Cloudgizer works on Red Hat/CentOS Linux with the Apache web server and MariaDB database. It is licensed under Apache License version 2. Read more

James Bottomley on Linux, Containers, and the Leading Edge

It’s no secret that Linux is basically the operating system of containers, and containers are the future of the cloud, says James Bottomley, Distinguished Engineer at IBM Research and Linux kernel developer. Bottomley, who can often be seen at open source events in his signature bow tie, is focused these days on security systems like the Trusted Platform Module and the fundamentals of container technology. Read more

TransmogrifAI From Salesforce

  • Salesforce plans to open-source the technology behind its Einstein machine-learning services
    Salesforce is open-sourcing the method it has developed for using machine-learning techniques at scale — without mixing valuable customer data — in hopes other companies struggling with data science problems can benefit from its work. The company plans to announce Thursday that TransmogrifAI, which is a key part of the Einstein machine-learning services that it believes are the future of its flagship Sales Cloud and related services, will be available for anyone to use in their software-as-a-service applications. Consisting of less than 10 lines of code written on top of the widely used Apache Spark open-source project, it is the result of years of work on training machine-learning models to predict customer behavior without dumping all of that data into a common training ground, said Shubha Nabar, senior director of data science for Salesforce Einstein.
  • Salesforce open-sources TransmogrifAI, the machine learning library that powers Einstein
    Machine learning models — artificial intelligence (AI) that identifies relationships among hundreds, thousands, or even millions of data points — are rarely easy to architect. Data scientists spend weeks and months not only preprocessing the data on which the models are to be trained, but extracting useful features (i.e., the data types) from that data, narrowing down algorithms, and ultimately building (or attempting to build) a system that performs well not just within the confines of a lab, but in the real world.