Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Circumventing Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft

Notwithstanding the fact it will be many years before very many corporate users might be able to work in a "Microsoft-free" environment, there appears to be significant effort being put forth to make it a reality. From the geekiest tech pubs, like the Java Developer's Journal to august ones such as The Wall Street Journal, circumventing Microsoft is a hot topic.

I choose "circumvention" deliberately, as many of the strategies intend not so much to eliminate Microsoft from the equation but to limit our dependence on Microsoft and limit the payments users make to same.

The rise of the browser as the ubiquitous client portal has already loosened Microsoft's grip on the desktop. After all, if I use applications like Salesforce.com (and myriad others) that are built with the browser, I can get my job done from any browser-enabled computer - which is to say any computer.

Microsoft has devoted massive amounts of effort into making .Net into a top-notch development framework (and, I think succeeding in that effort.) Also, the Mono project was formed to allow developers of .Net applications to be able to run on non-Windows platforms (because Microsoft only provides a Windows run time). If Mono achieves its goals it will let developers leverage Microsoft efforts while ultimately circumventing Microsoft.

Finally, in the bowels of geekdom, you'll find the Apache Jakarta POI project, the goal of which is to circumvent (again) Microsoft by providing an API that lets Java programs access Microsoft Office file formats.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

DNF Plugins Extend The Functionality Of Fedora's Yum Successor

With the upcoming Fedora 22 release due out in May, DNF is positioned to replace Yum as the default package manager. While there's been many DNF articles on Phoronix in past months, one of the aspects not covered much to this point is the dnf-plugins-extra package that's in its very early stages. Version 0.0.3 of dnf-plugins-extras was released today as a collection of DNF plugins done by the community. Read more

CoreOS Releases Building Block For Distributed Systems

Hyperscale Linux operating system specialist CoreOS said it is releasing its latest open source component for sharing and managing configuration data and other functions used in distributed systems. San Francisco-based CoreOS announced its first stable release of etcd, or “etc distributed,” an open-source distributed key value store that provides the backbone of CoreOS clusters and the etcd clients that run on each machine in a cluster. “Our goal with etcd has been to make building and using distributed systems easier,” CoreOS CTO Brandon Philips said Wednesday (January 28) in announcing the release. Read more

The 5 best open source email clients for Linux

Windows users have Outlook; Mac users have Mail. What options are there for Linux users? As it turns out, Linux land is rich with email clients. I have chosen five of the best, fully open source email clients (with two exceptions) for Linux users. Each has its pros and cons, and which email client is best for you is heavily dependent upon your needs. Read more

LibreOffice 4.4 Released With Major UI Revamp

A new version of open-source office suite LibreOffice is now available for download and the hands behind it are calling it ‘the most beautiful’ release ever. Jan Holesovsky, leader of the LibreOffice design team, says “LibreOffice 4.4 has got a lot of UX and design love, and in my opinion is the most beautiful ever.” The productivity suite, which was spun out of the slow moving OpenOffice project back in 2010, has certainly upped its game in the design department over the past few years, with each release of the 4.x series adding finesse. Read more