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Interview with Liam Bennett: creating a SMS service in Australia using GNU/Linux

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Interviews

I am always interested when a company uses GNU/Linux to create really, really useful services. When that company is in your own town, and I get to spend time with the person who created it and made it successful, I get even more excited! Liam Bennett manages eConfirm Inc, an Australian company that offers SMS sending — and responding — services, based on GNU/Linux. Here’s what Liam has to say about his experience with GNU/Linux and free software in general.

TM: Thank you for answering my questions, Liam. You are a boot-strapping a company using GNU/Linux. Can you tell me what you do, in simple words?

We provide a two way SMS system for business and corporate users. This service has been built using LAMP technologies (GNU/Linux, Apache, MySql, PHP) which we initially looked at for prototyping only but proved to be so solid we kept using it for our production system.

The service is used for a variety of tasks such as a field staff communications, automating appointment reminders, automating health / safety checks and system monitoring.

TM: When did you decide to use GNU/Linux rather than Windows? Was it right from the start?

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