Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

CLI Magic: sudo voodoo

Filed under
HowTos

Sudo is a handy little tool that is of value to both system administrators and common folks like us. What does it do? It allows you to temporarily assume the permissions of another user, up to and including root. If you belong to the camp that says you should only have root privileges at the time they are needed, sudo makes your life a little easier by making it easier to shape-shift between the permissions for a mere mortal and those of the super user.

We'll start with an easy -- and not uncommon -- example. You need to make a change to a configuration file in order to take advantage of your latest hardware acquisition. Gedit is your editor of choice, but you need root privileges in order to write a modified version of the config. What to do?

Full Article.

More in Tux Machines

Security: MuddyWater, DJI, Updates, Reproducible Builds and Excel

today's howtos

Android Leftovers

7 tools for analyzing performance in Linux with bcc/BPF

A new technology has arrived in Linux that can provide sysadmins and developers with a large number of new tools and dashboards for performance analysis and troubleshooting. It's called the enhanced Berkeley Packet Filter (eBPF, or just BPF), although these enhancements weren't developed in Berkeley, they operate on much more than just packets, and they do much more than just filtering. I'll discuss one way to use BPF on the Fedora and Red Hat family of Linux distributions, demonstrating on Fedora 26. BPF can run user-defined sandboxed programs in the kernel to add new custom capabilities instantly. It's like adding superpowers to Linux, on demand. Examples of what you can use it for include: Read more