Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

tuxmachines issues lately

Filed under
Site News

I've been putting off blogging what's going on with tuxmachines lately because number 1: I don't really know what happened, and number 2: I don't really know what's gonna happen. But here's what I do know.

The Sunday evening of January 25 I lost my internet connection and could not reconnect. I called Bellsouth and they informed me that I had to connect through the modem instead of using any software on my computer. That made it impossible to associate my given static IP with the dynamic IP that is assigned to the dsl modem when it connects. So, when I tried to set my static IP in the modem, it wouldn't connect. Bellsouth told me that you can't do that with a block of IPs like I had, you had to be assigned only one. So, they deleted all my static IPs instead of just the extraneous ones and tuxmachines was screwed until the new IP propagated. However, connectivity was slow and iffy. I couldn't download an ISO, I couldn't surf the web without sites timing out more often than not. And my site was performing very poorly. I had set the modem up to pass all traffic through it without interferrence, but something was wrong. And tech support was uncaring and unhelpful. Basically they wanted my server off their service.

So, I decided to move my site to offsite hosting, get cable internet and phone, and cut bellsouth off entirely. But the host I had chosen didn't appear to be working out - if you recall the later part of last week seeing a placeholder for a day or two then it went down for a day and half?

Well, I signed up for no-ip dynamic IP service and put my home server back online. This is what we are running on right now. However, while this dynamic IP service monitors my computer for changing IP and will adjust its files accordingly very quickly - any time I get a new IP, my site will be down for days for some visitors until their resolving nameservers catch up. Obviously, this is not a permanent solution.

And this is where we are this morning. I was having connectivity issues yesterday morning for no apparent reason. The connection just went down several times. It seems to have stablized for now.

Today, we were offline while the cable guys were messing with stringing up the cable phone and stuff. So, until we get a new IP, we should be okay unless the dead tree hanging by a thread over my cable wire goes down. And with the winds hitting 35 to 40 mph today, this is a real possibility.

I'm in the process of finding out what happened at that host company and am considering some other hosting companies. I'm not sure where we will end up and how it work out. We may have to host hop around some (causing more downtime). But funds are a real issue lately. I'm thinking of starting a donation drive and will speak more on that later. If you'd like to donate now, please click on the Support Tuxmachines link at the right. If money wasn't an issue, I could just go and get a good dedicated machine at a reputable hosting company. As it is is how it is.

I've got to tell you that more than once in the past week I've thought of giving up. The ad revenue earned from this site each month is less than I earn from selling one article and with all the headaches lately...

Anyway, if we go down, just keep checking back. Hopefully, we'll have everything ironed out soon. I'll try to keep you updated.

Thanks,
Susan

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

BellSouth/check is in the mail

As far as I can tell, BellSouth defines "uncaring" in the Telecom industry. I was so glad to see the end of them when I moved. Closing out my account with them was such an aggravating experience, though, that there was no way I was going to consider their parent (AT&T) when I was looking for cellphone service after my relocation.

I do hope you find a way to keep the site alive. It's been a very useful service.

Tuxmachines is very worthwhile

It wasn't until Tuxmachines went down that I realized just how much I relied on the site for news. I want to encourage you what great work you do here on this site. Please don't get discouraged--it is worth it.
I run around 30 Drupal sites myself and have had lots of hosting experiences. For what it is worth, I have found my current hosters: http://rimuhosting.com/ have given me easily the best experience. For what it is worth I have written a short tutorial on how I got Drupal set up on their servers: http://drup.org/installing-drupal-rimuhosting-com

thanks

thanks for saying. I'm trying.

ISP's

I'll bet we've all had an issue with different ISP's. When I went with the Charter Cable bundle (Internet, TV, Phone), my service went to hell.

Charter Cable has major technical problems in supporting this bundle. Not to mention the local outlet rep is just plain rude to their customers.

I'm now with Qwest for phone, for Internet--a local ISP called Outreach Internet who has their main antenna on a hillside near my house for a great connection, and Direct TV for my TV services.

No more Charter Cable services, forever. It's great to live in an area where you have some alternatives.

re: ISP's

Bellsouth and Charter are our choices here. Sad

I'd been happy with Bellsouth for the most part until that Sunday night. They'd always been nice before that. But something changed not just with their infrastructure but their attitudes too. They just didn't seem want my business anymore.

How much bandwidth?

Susan - What are your requirements from hosting? How much disk space, bandwidth per month, that kind of thing? I may have a solution for these problems.
__________________________________________________________________
Ubuntu is lame as a duck- not the metaphorical lame duck, but more like a real duck that hurt its leg, maybe by stepping on a land mine.

re: bandwidth

I think my site uses less than 200 GB a month since I stopped posting so many new screenshots. My server uses about 10 GB of space, so say 20 GB. Drupal with mysql is quite the hog. Even with version 5.x being a bit better, it's still a resource pig.

Drupal resources

There are some very simple things you can do to greatly decrease Drupal's resource requirements. You can install a APC cache for example. Also, Drupal 6 does very good caching for anonymous users that will decrease the database access. On the plus side, Drupal greatly improves your SEO and is one of the reasons that tuxmachines ranks so well in Google. If you want any help, just let me know.

Well, based on your

Well, based on your description, it sounds like the site would fit well on a Linode. $39.99 a month, 18 gigs hard drive space, 540 megs ram, 300 gig transfer (soft limit), and you have full root control of the distro of your choice. You can drop by #linode on irc.oftc.net for more info, or check out http://linode.com. I hope everything works out!
__________________________________________________________________
Ubuntu is lame as a duck- not the metaphorical lame duck, but more like a real duck that hurt its leg, maybe by stepping on a land mine.

Caught up

I caught up all that you posted. Keep up the wonderful work. You're among the last ones standing (not just in FOSS... the press in general is dying as you can probably tell).

I got some mails today from an editor and writer who were laid off.

More in Tux Machines

4MLinux 18.0 Distro Released with Support for LibreOffice 5.2, Thunderbird 45.1

4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki has just informed Softpedia today, July 1, 2016, about the immediate availability for download of the final release of the 4MLinux 18.0 operating system. Read more

GNU/Linux Leftovers

  • Not Love
    I had seen GNU/Linux once before in my life. At a previous school, the husband of one of the teachers installed it on a PC in my presence. He couldn’t get it working…. Still, I read that GNU/Linux did not crash. I needed that. I was willing to make the effort to download and install GNU/Linux if I could have only that. Our Internet connection was a few KB/s on dial-up… I spent two weekends and five evenings downloading an .iso CD-image with FileZilla or something on a Mac in the lab. I had never burned a CD before but tried once copying the file to the CD. That wouldn’t boot. I discovered CD imaging… So, on the second try, I had a CD that would boot on the machines. I first did one machine and it wouldn’t start X. Having never seen X before, this was a problem but it turned out all I needed was the scanning frequencies for the CRT in a configuration file. Google helped me find those for each of my five different kinds of monitors. Suddenly, the PCs were useful with GNU/Linux.
  • Linux Under the Hood: Silence of the RAM
    Now that I see the events of the last week chronicled clearly in front of my very eyes, maybe the disparaging old junk man was right after all. I’m shameless enough to admit my own idiocy as long as it leads to learning from my mistakes. Maybe Linux isn’t rocket science, but installing RAM was sure beginning to feel like it.
  • Check out our new issue plus win an ebook bundle!
  • 30 days in a terminal: Day 10 — The experiment is over
    When I set out to spend 30 days living entirely in a Linux terminal, I knew there was a distinct possibility I would fail utterly. I mean, 30 days? No GUI software? No Xorg? Just describing it sounds like torture. And torture it was. Mostly. Some moments, though, were pretty damned amazing. Not amazing enough to help me reach my 30-day goal, mind you. I fell short—only making it to day 10.
  • Bad Voltage Episode 70 Has Been Released: Delicious Amorphous Tech Bubble
  • Tokyo: Automotive Linux Summit
    Engineers will gather in Tokyo July 13-14 for the annual Automotive Linux Summit, a conference where auto-industry stakeholders discuss the adoption of an open-source Linux-based platform for in-vehicle infotainment. The two-day summit brings together automotive systems engineers, Linux experts, developers and other players.
  • Oxenfree, an adventure game with supernatural elements, available on Linux
    This well-received indie title has been ported over to Linux. Combining plenty of elements of 80s teen movies and packaging them in a polished adventure, Oxenfree may be worth checking out if you’re a fan of adventure games.
  • Space station management game, The Spatials: Galactology, is confirmed to be coming for Linux
    This is an expanded and reimagined version of the management sim, The Spatials. It’s yet to be released but the developers have confirmed that a Linux version is in the works.
  • Red Hat Storage VP sees different uses for Ceph, Gluster
    Red Hat Storage showed off updates to its Ceph and Gluster software and laid out its strategy for working with containers at this week’s Red Hat Summit in San Francisco.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Leftovers: OSS

  • Google and GitHub are Opening a New Window on Open Source
    Where can you find millions of open source code repositories? That would be on GitHub, of course, and with all those code repositories, one would think that analyzing them would lead to some interesting conclusions about open source in general, correct? That's the thinking behind a new offering from GitHub in partnership with Google. The two have produced a new open dataset on Google BigQuery, a low cost analytics data warehouse service in the cloud, so that anyone can get data-driven insights based on more than 2.8 million open source GitHub repositories. The move brings new data analytics capabilities to BigQuery.
  • Open Source Gospel From Cisco’s Lauren Clooney
    Companies that traditionally focused on proprietary software are now playing catch up in order to compete by utilizing open source development.
  • My condolences, you’re now the maintainer of a popular open source project
    Marc Andreessen, creator of the Netscape web browser, famously said "software is eating the world." I’d like to posit that it’s actually open source software that’s eating the world, and I have a couple of data points to back me up. First, a conclusion from the 2015 Future of Open Source survey: “Seventy-eight percent of respondents said their companies run part or all of its operations on OSS and 66 percent said their company creates software for customers built on open source. This statistic has nearly doubled since 2010.”
  • Tip: Try these open-source investigative journalism tools
    The Investigative Reporters and Editors conference took place in mid-June in New Orleans, and one of the sessions at the event looked at open-source tools for investigations. This 'Steal my tool' session highlighted a number of useful open-source investigative platforms, which Sam Berkhead, engagement editor at IJNet, listed in this article published after the conference.
  • DuckDuckGo: The Little Search Engine That Gives Back Big
    The company’s website says, “DuckDuckGo is a general purpose search engine that is intended to be your starting place when searching the Internet. Use it to get way more instant answers, way less spam and real privacy, which we believe adds up to a much better overall search experience.” [...] Proprietor Gabriel Weinberg says his once-personal project (founded in 2008) isn’t making anyone wealthy, but he and his workers live decently, and he says they’re doing well enough that giving money to open source projects doesn’t hurt their budget.
  • Understanding open source licenses
    Open source licenses are licenses that comply with the Open Source Definition — in brief, they allow software to be freely used, modified, and shared. To be approved by the Open Source Initiative (also known as the OSI), a license must go through the Open Source Initiative’s license review process. There has been an increase release of open source software from the day of Linux. Today most popular frame works like bootstrap and software such as Atom IDE used by developers are open source. We often never worry about using open source code but do you know what the license under which the frame you’re using was released means?
  • Build your own open source solar panels
    Do-it-yourself electricity generation is still difficult and expensive. The inventors of the SunZilla project aim to make it easier, cleaner, portable, quiet, and completely open source. The SunZilla system is designed to replace diesel and gasoline-powered generators for portable and emergency power: camping, events, mobile phone charging station, provide power to refugee camps, or keep the lights on during a power outage. Two people can set it up in a few minutes. It is modular and plug-and-play. Leonie Gildein is one of the five SunZilla engineers, and kindly answered some questions about the project.
  • Lessons From The Downfall Of A $150M Crowdfunded Experiment In Decentralized Governance
    Hype around blockchain has risen to an all-time high. A technology once perceived to be the realm of crypto-anarchists and drug dealers has gained increasing popular recognition for its revolutionary potential, drawing billions in venture-capital investment by the world's leading financial institutions and technology companies. Regulators, rather than treating blockchain platforms (such as Bitcoin or Ethereum) and other "distributed ledgers" merely as tools of illicit dark markets, are beginning to look at frameworks to regulate and incorporate this important technology into traditional commerce.
  • Openfunds launches global standard for fund data interchange
    The standard is published on the openfunds website and can be used by anyone free of charge.