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10 free Linux alternatives to OpenOffice.org

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Software

OpenOffice.org has a reputation for being the premiere office suit for the Linux platform. Maybe so but these days, it’s not exactly a lean slab of software anymore, particularly if you just want to try a component and don’t actually want the whole box and dice. Netbooks are one device category that comes to mind, for sure.

But what are the alternatives? The reality is, for better or worse, the world is still dominated by Microsoft’s Office so any alternatives must have at least .doc (Word) and .xls (Excel) support. You could argue that beyond that, support for anything else is a bonus. Even if you don’t want or need MS support, there are days when a quick message doesn’t require a complete office suite to unleash itself onto your unsuspecting PC.

And with netbooks becoming such a popular alternative to traditional computing devices, software with a small storage footprint should be well and truly on your radar if you’re considering ditching the Windows XP Home Edition operating system your netbook will most likely come with.
I’ve split the options into complete office suite alternatives, word processors, spreadsheets and presentation applications.

rest here




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