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OLPC no longer wants to change the world

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OLPC

There is more disquieting news emerging from the One Laptop per Child project - or what remains of it, following the sackings and budget cuts in January.

From wanting to "change the world", the project now wants to make only large-scale deployments. The "change the world" scheme meant that people could buy lots of anything from 100 to 1000 of the little XO laptops for places of their choice.

The project was conceived by the MIT media lab's Nicholas Negroponte and its aim was to provide cheap laptops to underprivileged children. What it produced was a novel gadget known as the XO but it came in at double the intended cost - $US200 instead of $100.

According to the OLPC site, the "Change the world" scheme meant one could donate 100 or more laptops and decide on where they would be deployed.

rest here




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