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How to add Awn main menu applet in AWN 0.3.2

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As soon as I read about the release of Avant Window Navigator 0.3.2 on tuxmachines, I decided to install it on my Ubuntu 8.10 from the Awn Core PPA repos. The latest Awn 0.3.2 has seen a few applets been removed, one of them being the good old AWN main menu. This is a quick guide to add the AWN main menu applet in AWN 0.3.2.

1. Download awn-extras-applets-trunk_0.3.1~bzr1072-intrepid1-1_i386.deb. This is a debian package from the PPA awn-testing repos of a previous version which has the relevant AWN main menu files.

2. Open the debian file with any archive manager. It will have a file named data.tar.gz or something. Open that file and browse to "/./usr/lib/awn/applets/" directory where you will find "main-menu" directory. Extract the "main-menu" directory to "/usr/lib/awn/applets/".

3. Almost done! All you need to do now is create a .desktop file.
sudo gedit /usr/share/avant-window-navigator/applets/awnmenu.desktop

Paste the following in the file and save it.

[Desktop Entry]
Type=Application
X-AWN-AppletType=C
Name=Awn Main Menu
Comment=Avant's System Menu
Exec=/usr/lib/awn/applets/main-menu/main-menu.so
Icon=gnome-main-menu
X-AWN-AppletCategory=Utility
X-Ubuntu-Gettext-Domain=awn-extras-applets

That's it !! You are done !!! Just restart AWN and add the applet from the list.

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Just installing trunk

I just had to install the testing trunk version after adding the testing PPA to my sources.list and there was the main menu applet, without doing anything else, Smile

Another work-around

An AWN developer pointed out to me that AWN main menu applet has not been dropped. It just isn't installed by default anymore. You have to install awn-applets-c-extras package. It contains AWN main menu as well as other applets written in C.

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