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Windows Is Proof That People Are Too Stupid To Use Computers

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Microsoft

And too stupid or dishonest to report Microsoft Windows as the defective disaster that it is. If it were any other type of product it would have banned from every country in the world long ago. The BBC reports the latest Windows Conficker worm outbreak in typical "oh no big deal" fashion, does not identify this as a Windows worm until several paragraphs into the article, quotes industry security vendors as though they were actually worth listening to and not useless weasels, and then blames end users.

Please excuse me while I go kick something. Of COURSE it's the users' fault. They're still using this most expensive piece of defective crapware in the entire solar system.

I am NOT making this up! Microsoft itself, the richest software company ever, famous for having a cash hoard of tens of billions of dollars, famous for spending billions of dollars developing Windows and yet still can't code its way out of a soggy tissue, is offering a reward.

rest here




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