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HOW TO: Introduce Ubuntu into your workplace

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Ubuntu

Yesterday afternoon, and a bit of this morning, saw the installation of Ubuntu 8.4 onto a machine in the studio at Refresh. We’ve had Ubuntu on a laptop, as a secondary operating system, for a while now, however this is the first machine to run Ubuntu as it’s primary operating system. Having worked with the system a bit here and there, and now for a few hours today, I’ve truly seen the power and potential of using an Ubuntu system. There are a large number of people who feel uneasy with Ubuntu (and Linux in general) and feel that it is meant for “geeks” and computer-savvy folks only. This is not the case. I decided I’d put together a basic guide of what I did, how I did it and what I installed on the system once it was up and running.

1. BUY A COMPUTER TO RUN UBUNTU.

Ubuntu doesn’t require too much juice to run. The machine I installed on is a Celeron 2.4GHz with 218MB RAM and no graphics card. Admitedly, it does run a bit sluggishly but it does run. A refurbished computer or a very entry level machine would be enough to run Ubuntu and several third-party applications.

2. GET UBUNTU.

rest here




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