Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Computers bad for kids

Filed under
Misc

Using a computer at home might actually reduce a child's performance in maths, science and English rather than improve it, a study has found.

Researchers who looked at 100,000 children in 32 countries originally found that children from homes with computers performed better. In fact houses with computers were likely to be from a richer social class, and when these factors were removed performance was less than expected.

But books do have a positive impact on a child's performance at school. Children living in a house with more than 500 books in it do much better at maths and science than those in homes without books.

Researchers believe computers could damage learning in one of two ways. Either learning on a computer is less effective than other methods or home computers are distracting kids who are spending time browsing or sending email rather than doing their homework.

Phil Hemmings, director of corporate affairs at education hardware specialist RM, told el Reg: "It's tricky looking at just one piece of research because there's always something else which says the reverse - BECTA, for instance, has research showing the benefits of computer use in schools."

Hemmings said computers are just another resource: "Schools which use their resources well have better results than those that don't."
The research is being presented this week to the Royal Economic Society's Annual Conference in Nottingham by Thomas Fuchs and Ludger Woessmann of Munich University. It is a re-examination of data gathered in 2000. The conference is also looking at the economic impact of war in Iraq and elsewhere and the effects of emigration of skilled workers.

Getting computers into schools has been a key part of this government's education, education, education policy. Chancellor Gordon Brown included measures to allow kids to lease cheap computers for use at home in last week's Budget. More details on the Guardian website here

Leeched from theregister.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Leftovers: KDE

  • KDE Partition Manager Now Lets Users Resize Encrypted Filesystems with LUKS
    Andrius Štikonas announced the release of the KDE Partition Manager 2.2.0 open-source partition editor software designed specifically for the KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment, as well as the KPMcore 2.2.0 utility. KDE Partition Manager and KPMcore 2.2.0 are two major release, finally bringing proper LUKS (Linux Unified Key Setup) support, in the way that the software is now capable of creating LUKS volumes on disk drivers, as well as to format the inner file system, besides detecting the LUKS container.
  • KDE Partition Manager 2.2 Brings Proper LUKS Support
    The KDE Partition Manager, the promising disk partitioning application that's become a viable alternative to GParted, is up to version 2.2. KDE Partition Manager 2.2 was released this week by Andrius Štikonas and its big feature is proper LUKS support. The KDE Partition Manager can now properly handle LUKS encrypted volumes with support for creating them and formatting the inner file-system, opening/closing LUKS volumes, resizing support, and more.
  • I have a problem...
    Every day, a sizable number of people posts problems on the KDE Community Forums and the ever-helpful staff does their best to solve whatever issues they’re facing. But what exactly does one do when this happens? This post provides more insights on the process.

Parrot Security OS 3.0 "Lithium" Is a Linux Distro for Cryptography & Anonymity

A few days ago, Parrot Security OS developer Frozenbox Network teased users on Twitter with the upcoming release of the long anticipated Parrot Security OS 3.0 "Lithium" distribution. Based on the latest Debian GNU/Linux technologies and borrowing many of the packages from the Debian 8 "Jessie" stable repositories, Parrot Security OS 3.0 just received new Release Candidate (RC) ISO builds that users can now download and install on their personal computer if they want to get an early taste of what's coming. Read more

Kernel Space/Linux