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Debian GNU/Linux 5.0 codename Lenny

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Linux

Long-awaited “Lenny” has finally been out! After 22 months of development, Debian development team announced the official release of Debian GNU/Linux 5.0 on 14th of February as planned and the very same day I installed and tested it on my laptop.

Installation

This is the first time that a Debian release comes with a graphical installer, though the text-based installation is still the default option. The Debian installer in the DVD that I have used offered different options like expert mode, default desktop selection, etc. The overall installation process was easy and smooth. One of the good things was having the chance to load non-free firmwares from a USB flash drive during the installation because my laptop has Intel 4965 AGN wifi, which needs some binary firmware to work.

rest here




install video codecs and DVD support

Note: This is a classic how-to intended for beginners and it describes how to install video codecs and DVD support on Debian Lenny in several easy-to-follow steps.

1. Add debian-multimedia.org repository to your sources.list file
To edit the /etc/apt/sources.list file, type as root:

nano /etc/apt/sources.list

Next, add the following two lines:

deb http://debian-multimedia.org/ lenny main
deb-src http://debian-multimedia.org lenny main

Save the file with ^O (CTRL+O) and close Nano with ^X.

For additional information about the debian-multimedia.org repository, visit the website.

2. Install debian-multimedia-keyring and update the list of packages
As root, type:

wget http://debian-multimedia.org/gpgkey.pub -O - | apt-key add - && apt-get install debian-multimedia-keyring

Then, to update the list of packages type:

apt-get update

3. Install w32codecs and libdvdcss2

apt-get install w32codecs libdvdcss2

That should do it. Next, you will need a video player, and I recommend one of VLC, SMPlayer or Kaffeine.

To install either of those, use:

apt-get install vlc
apt-get install smplayer
apt-get install kaffeine

That's it, you should be done now.

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