Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

The problem with "sudo"

I have written about biometrics a few days ago and how it's a bad idea to use biometric technologies for security. Today we'll be talking about a different rather popular security technology called "sudo".

Many linux distributions use "sudo" for pretty much everything (if you don't set one manually Ubuntu does set a random root password that you don't even have for example), "sudo" is installed on Mac OSX to allow you to gain full access to the system (espcially on the linux distributions that rely sudo all the GUI tools that modify the system are pretty much wrappers around sudo).

Now I don't want to talk about bugs. Every software has them, why should "sudo" be different, even though bugs in security software are often a lot nastier than in random apps? What I want to talk about is the actual problem I see in using "sudo".

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: Software

today's howtos

ACPI, kernels and contracts with firmware

This ends up being a pain in the neck in the x86 world, but it could be much worse. Way back in 2008 I wrote something about why the Linux kernel reports itself to firmware as "Windows" but refuses to identify itself as Linux. The short version is that "Linux" doesn't actually identify the behaviour of the kernel in a meaningful way. "Linux" doesn't tell you whether the kernel can deal with buffers being passed when the spec says it should be a package. "Linux" doesn't tell you whether the OS knows how to deal with an HPET. "Linux" doesn't tell you whether the OS can reinitialise graphics hardware. Read more