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The problem with "sudo"

I have written about biometrics a few days ago and how it's a bad idea to use biometric technologies for security. Today we'll be talking about a different rather popular security technology called "sudo".

Many linux distributions use "sudo" for pretty much everything (if you don't set one manually Ubuntu does set a random root password that you don't even have for example), "sudo" is installed on Mac OSX to allow you to gain full access to the system (espcially on the linux distributions that rely sudo all the GUI tools that modify the system are pretty much wrappers around sudo).

Now I don't want to talk about bugs. Every software has them, why should "sudo" be different, even though bugs in security software are often a lot nastier than in random apps? What I want to talk about is the actual problem I see in using "sudo".

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