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Gentoo: Yearly Releases - help or hurt Gentoo?

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Gentoo

I have been thinking for awhile now and can’t convince myself of an answer. Does the lack of yearly releases help or hurt Gentoo?

I enjoy Gentoo because I never have to re-install my host. The “rolling release” model is great, a model shared by nearly all(?) source-based distros. However, with our new automated weekly stages - which I think are a great idea, we lose a few things. In no particular order, we lose:

  • PR - new ‘releases’ generate a buzz on the distro sites and blog-o-sphere around the world.

  • Ability to say “we no longer support base installs before 20XX.Y” - repo changes, bash versions, portage upgrades, etc.
  • The appearance of activity. (This point is debatable)

However, with that being said, I think that yearly releases are also pointless with the presence of weekly stages, because:

rest here




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