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Is Gentoo dying or just becoming old?

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Gentoo

So I haven't really touched my Gentoo desktop in over a year since I bought my new laptop. I decided it was really time to upgrade the software on it, so I did an emerge --sync, changed to the newest 2008.0 profile and started looking at what shiney new software I'd get.

Well, Gnome 2.24 is still unstable. A bit disappointing, but there was a gentoo wiki page detailing all the packages I needed to put in /etc/portage/packages.keyword to get Gnome 2.24. So then I was looking at Xorg. xorg-server 1.3 is still the only stable release under Gentoo. It's like 2 years old now! Really? That is the best Gentoo can do? So then I started looking at other stuff. GCC 4.1 is still the latest stable release (4.3.* has been out for a year and 4.1's latest release is 2 years old). At which point I realized that if I wanted a current modern Linux system I either would HAVE to run a unstable Gentoo system, or change distros.

Looking at the fact that if I wanted to stay with Gentoo, I'd have a day or two of compiling a head of me, and then who knows what integration head aches as programs and config files change just to get a vaguely working vanilla Gnome system on an "unstable" Gentoo system, I balked.

It just didn't seem worth it.




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