Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Deep in Microsoft’s TomTom Linux patent claims

TomTom and FAT

Why do not TomTom and all the rest just format the SD cards as ext3. I know it is convenient to be able to just plug them into a Windows box for updates, but all TomTom need to do is add an ext3 Windows driver (readily available) to their install software and the cards would function transparently. Many of my SD cards are formatted as ext3 as they are only used in a Linux environment, and they all work on insertion just like they did when they were fat32.

Just a thought. Maybe a TomTom user can come up with a reason not to do this, but it would not be a problem with my Laser GPS.

GregE
Melbourne, Australia

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Linux in hi-rel is growing, says McPherson

Xilinx has joined the Linux Foundation, the industry organisation supporting growth of Linux and collaborative development. The FPGA firm’s interest indicates how Linux is expanding its footprint beyond consumer and computing markets and in high reliability industrial, automotive and aerospace systems. The theme of this year’s Embedded Linux Conference, which is sponsored by The Linux Foundation, was ‘Drones, Things and Automotive.’ Read more

BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition First-Time Boot - Video

Today we take a quick look at the first time boot and configuration of the BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition smartphone. Those of you who watched our unboxing video of the first ever Ubuntu Phone device, would know that it takes some time for the operating system to start when used for first time. Read more

Privacy and Tails 1.3

Privacy and security are difficult to come by in our progressively connected world. Advertisers track our browsing habits, employers monitor productivity and government agencies monitor our communications. Most operating systems do not take steps to protect our privacy or our identities, two things which are increasingly difficult to guard. Tails is a Linux distribution that is designed to help us stay anonymous on-line and protect our identity. Tails is a Debian-based live disc that we can use to scrub our files of meta data, browse the web with some degree of anonymity and send private messages. According to the project's website, "Tails is a live operating system, that you can start on almost any computer from a DVD, USB stick, or SD card. It aims at preserving your privacy and anonymity, and helps you to: use the Internet anonymously and circumvent censorship; all connections to the Internet are forced to go through the Tor network; leave no trace on the computer you are using unless you ask it explicitly; use state-of-the-art cryptographic tools to encrypt your files, emails and instant messaging." Read more

Review: Lenovo X1 Carbon 3rd generation and Linux

Considering that the fix for the first issue is widely available in most distributions and the second one is only a modprobe away, I’d say this laptop is pretty darned Linux compatible. I’m currently running Fedora 21 without any problems. Read more