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Qimo, Linux 4 Kids

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Linux

WHAT is a good age to introduce children to Linux/Free Open Source Software? My children are nine, and they regularly use FOSS without actually realising it or, I suspect, caring.

All they care about is being to replicate the presentations they did on their school computers at home; the school uses Microsoft software, at home we use OpenOffice.org and they are able to save their presentations in a format which will be accessible when they take them to show their teacher.

My daughter (the artistic one) could probably fill several hard drives with her initally simple Tuxpaint images and increasingly complex Inkscape vector drawings.

My son (the gamer) loves to play World of Goo, the cross-platform, DRM and region coding-free, physics-based platform game.

They are already more comfortable using a computer at the age of nine than I was at the age of 19, and that's both right and proper. In fact, I wish I had started their computer education at an even earlier age.

So, if you have a pre-school child sat at home making big crayony drawings on your walls, why not introduce them to Qimo 1.0?

rest here




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