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SGI to show next-generation Linux machines

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Hardware

Silicon Graphics will start showing off the Altix 4000 Monday, the second generation of the company's technical computing machines based on the Linux operating system and Itanium processors.

The high-performance systems will accommodate as many as 512 processors, as does the current Altix 3000, said Jill Matzke, SGI's head of Altix product marketing. But a new design lets it accommodate as much as 128 terabytes of memory, larger than the 24 terabyte limit of the Altix 3000 and about 250,000 times as much memory as is found in a mainstream PC.

SGI plans to show the systems at the SC2005 supercomputing show in Seattle this week.

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