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TomTom Linux impact light hit so far

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I’ve been talking to device manufacturers and the Linux-centered software providers that feed them code for mobile phones, TV set-top boxes, industrial control, automotive technology, medical devices, military uses and a slew of other categories commonly classified as embedded devices, and I can definitively report that I am not hearing or sensing any fear, uncertainty or doubt (FUD) as a result of Microsoft’s TomTom patent suit.

I wrote last month that the controversial MS TomTom suit was not aimed at Linux as much as TomTom and some market categories for Microsoft. While we must all remind ourselves that anything may be possible considering court rulings and Microsoft strategies, I don’t see Microsoft’s TomTom suit as truly aimed at Linux. If it is, I don’t see it having much, if any, impact on Linux. Many bloggers and posters are indicating that this suit is Microsoft’s effort to address the traction of embedded Linux, but I’m not seeing any signs of impact. In fact, the suit may end up driving embedded Linux forward and growing adoption even more if we look to the past.

I still have my suspicions




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