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Talking Community With Ubuntu's Jono Bacon

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Interviews
Ubuntu

This week I had a unique opportunity to talk with Ubuntu's community manager, Jono Bacon. As community manager, Bacon is the Ubuntu community's connection to Canonical, responsible for encouraging and supporting growth and harmony in the community.

This is no small feat, considering the recent rapid growth and adoption rates of Linux in general -- and Ubuntu in particular. Bacon shares a bit about the subtle (and not-so-subtle) nuances of managing and maintaining a healthy community -- from planning and assessing its growth, to encouraging (and appreciating) members who participate to the best of their abilities.

OStatic: Ubuntu has seen phenomenal growth since its first release. In October, Gerry Carr said that the Ubuntu forums had about 650,000 users and that there were roughly 170 LoCo groups -- and I recall reading somewhere that number now has passed the 200 LoCo team mark. Before we touch on the reasons for community growth, what are the most effective ways you've found to manage and direct that growth? What areas of managing community growth require particularly careful handling?

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