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At the Sounding Edge: Music Notation Software for Linux, Part 2

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HowTos

Last month I introduced the ABC music notation system. This month, I continue our tour of notation programs for Linux with a look at the Common Music Notation system from composer/programmer Bill Schottstaedt.

Common Music Notation (CMN) is a Lisp-based language for creating and editing musical scores. It provided a full complement of music symbols and other scoring amenities, such as score sizing and text underlay. Output from CMN is in the Encapsulated PostScript (EPS) format, which is printable by any PostScript-compatible printer. In addition, your output files can be viewed with standard Linux PostScript viewers, such as GhostView and GhostScript.

CMN is a powerful music notation specification language. Although it lacks a mouse-driven graphical interface, the language elements will be immediately familiar to users who know the naming conventions for common, and some not so common, music notation symbols. CMN is capable of handling almost any scoring requirement, including many 20th century additions to the standard notation symbol palette.

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