Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

‘attempt to access beyond end of device’ Linux Error

Filed under
Linux

Alike other operating systems’ kernel, Linux Kernel is the resource of various services to the system. While the Linux Kernel errors occur, it generally indicates problems with file system or some memory that it can’t get access to. In some cases, the solution may require Linux Data Recovery for the cause- data loss. Users may get an error in sys log, similar to:“attempt to access beyond end of device”The error is generally encountered while attempting to access a Linux partition, trying to mount it or while starting the system. The error specifications also include rw, limit and want parameters that define some sector numbers. BackgroundThe reason why the error message occurs is that system tries to access such sectors that are not there on disk. If Linux file system is corrupt then the including metadata information like control block or directory communicates incorrect location of inode, which actually doesn’t exist. But when the device driver looks for it on disk, it fais and an error, like above, is encountered.SolutionDamaged file system needs repair. So fsck can be used to correct this corruption. But if the extent of damage is high enough then fsck may not help. In this case, it is required to recreate the file system by disk formatting and recover the data from backup. If data backup exists in required state i.e. complete and intact, it will provide data restoration. However if it fails or doesn’t exist, Linux Recovery applications can be used to extract lost information from affected drive. Linux Data Recovery software are graphically rich tools that use scanning procedures to analyze and recover data from failed hard drives. These recovery solutions are valid to be used in each logical data loss case, except from data overwriting. The applications are safe as of read-only design. Also, they offer suitable options that permit recovering and restoring recovered information to the desired location. The applications are installed on other than affected drive in order to prevent overwriting. Stellar Phoenix Data Recovery Linux is the best and safest Linux Recovery application to be used with ext2, ext3 and reiserFS file systems. The software is known for using the most potent scanning algorithms and for offering interactive interface. We can use this application with most of Linux distributions including Suse, RedHat, TurboLinux, SlackWare, Gentoo, Fedora Core, Debian, Ubuntu and others.  

More in Tux Machines

Free Software: Kiwi TCMS 4.2, PeerTube in the News

  • Kiwi TCMS: Kiwi TCMS 4.2
    We're happy to announce Kiwi TCMS and tcms-api version 4.2! This is a security, bug-fix and enhancement update which upgrades to the latest Django version under Python 3.6. We've pushed new kiwitcms/kiwi:latest docker image to Docker Hub and updated the demo instance at https://demo.kiwitcms.org! This version also includes GDPR related changes which affect our project. Read below for the details.
  • PeerTube: An Open Source YouTube Alternative To Beat Censorship
    When it’s about watching videos online, YouTube is the first thing that comes to our minds. But the popular video sharing platform is often subjected to censorship in many countries. There are many countries including China and North Korea that ban YouTube from time to time. Leave the others, recently, even YouTube ended up blocking many legitimate Channels as a collateral damage of its copyright crackdown. Ultimately, the content creators are the ones who get affected due to all of this blocking.
  • PeerTube: A ‘Censorship’ Resistent YouTube Alternative

    YouTube is a great video platform that has a lot to offer to both consumers and creators. At least, those who play by the rules. For creators, there is a major drawback though, one that put a spotlight on the alternative 'free-libre' software PeerTube this week.

OpenBSD chief de Raadt says no easy fix for new Intel CPU bug

Recompiling is unlikely to be a catch-all solution for a recently unveiled Intel CPU vulnerability known as TLBleed, the details of which were leaked on Friday, the head of the OpenBSD project Theo de Raadt says. The details of TLBleed, which gets its name from the fact that the flaw targets the translation lookaside buffer, a CPU cache, were leaked to the British tech site, The Register; the side-channel vulnerability can be theoretically exploited to extract encryption keys and private information from programs. Read more

Kernel Space: Linux and Systemd

  • Linus Torvalds tells kernel devs to fix their regressive fixing
    Linus Torvalds has given the Linux kernel development community a bit of a touch-up, after finding some contributions to Linux 4.18 complicated the kernel development process. In his post announcing release candidate 2 of Linux kernel 4.18, Torvalds mentioned “some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs.” “I'm going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have been in rc2. They were ‘fixes’ not in the ‘regressions’ sense, but in the ‘missing features’ sense.”
  • Why data centers need log management tools

    Even though systemd is a common logging method, rsyslog offers more features. One main capability is being able to write log messages to a specific database. You can also configure rsyslog logs on one main server for centralized access.

  • Systemd v239 released
    Systemd v239 has been released with a long list of changes; click below for the full set. "A new system.conf setting NoNewPrivileges= is now available which may be used to turn off acquisition of new privileges system-wide (i.e. set Linux' PR_SET_NO_NEW_PRIVS for PID 1 itself, and thus also for all its children). Note that turning this option on means setuid binaries and file system capabilities lose their special powers. While turning on this option is a big step towards a more secure system, doing so is likely to break numerous pre-existing UNIX tools, in particular su and sudo."

Canonical/Ubuntu Watching You

  • Two-thirds of Ubuntu users are happy to give up data on their PC
    As announced back at the start of the year, Canonical made the decision that Ubuntu would collect data on its user base – and now the initial results of those statistics have been published by the firm, including the headline fact that 67% of users were happy to provide details of their PC (and other bits and pieces). So, this scheme that has been unfavorably compared to Microsoft’s collection of telemetry data in Windows 10, which has long been a point of controversy. However, it appears that the majority of folks are happy to give up their data to the company providing their Linux distribution, and don’t seem perturbed by this prospect.
  • Ubuntu reports 67% of users opt in to on-by-default PC specs slurp [Ed: 33% of Ubuntu users say to Canonical "don't spy on me" and Canonical then counts them, which means that Canonical collects data on them, too]
    However just 33 per cent of the undisclosed number of users Canonical’s analysed didn’t opt in to the slurpage. Which is where things get a little bit weird, because Canonical’s post reports an “Opt In rate”. Yet the data slurpage is selected by default: there’s an active opt out but a passive opt in.
  • The Average Ubuntu Install Takes 18 Minutes (And Other Stats)
    Did you know that the average Ubuntu install takes just 18 minutes? That’s one of several nuggets of information Canonical has collected (and now revealed) thanks to the new “Ubuntu Report” tool included in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS. This tool, when given permission to, collects non-identifiable system data about new Ubuntu installs and upgrades and ferries it back to Canonical for analysis.