Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Matrix Online (finally) jacks in

Filed under
Gaming

Nearly three years after it was first announced, The Matrix Online has finally gone...online. Copublishers Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment and Sega announced today that the massively multiplayer online game is en route to retailers across North America, after being pushed back from its previously announced January 18 launch date. Originally, the game was to be published by Ubisoft. However, Ubi and Warner Bros. semi-amicably dissolved their deal in February 2004 for undisclosed reasons. Three months later at E3, Sega announced it would help distribute the game.

Developed by Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment's now in-house studio, Monolith Productions, The Matrix Online is set in the titular artificial reality of The Matrix films. Players will create a character that belongs to one of three factions: Zion, the Machines, or the Merovingians. Each faction will be spotlighted in nine trailers for the game, three of which launched today on its official Web site. The game will feature many characters from the films, and it will also feature the voices and likenesses of original actors Laurence Fishburne (Morpheus), Monica Bellucci (Persephone), and Lambert Wilson (the Merovingian).

The Matrix Online is rated "T" for Teen and will retail for $49.99, with a subsequent monthly subscription fee of $14.99. Gamers who preordered the game got access to it three days ahead of the general public, and their in-game characters received an advanced-level "hyper jump" ability.
Until GameSpot's full review of The Matrix Online goes up next week, feel free to check out our previous coverage of the game.

Live links at gamespot.

More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

Uselessd: A Stripped Down Version Of Systemd

The boycotting of systemd has led to the creation of uselessd, a new init daemon based off systemd that tries to strip out the "unnecessary" features. Uselessd in its early stages of development is systemd reduced to being a basic init daemon process with "the superfluous stuff cut out". Among the items removed are removing of journald, libudev, udevd, and superfluous unit types. Read more

Open source is not dead

I don’t think you can compare Red Hat to other Linux distributions because we are not a distribution company. We have a business model on Enterprise Linux. But I would compare the other distributions to Fedora because it’s a community-driven distribution. The commercially-driven distribution for Red Hat which is Enterprise Linux has paid staff behind it and unlike Microsoft we have a Security Response Team. So for example, even if we have the smallest security issue, we have a guaranteed resolution pattern which nobody else can give because everybody has volunteers, which is fine. I am not saying that the volunteers are not good people, they are often the best people in the industry but they have no hard commitments to fixing certain things within certain timeframes. They will fix it when they can. Most of those people are committed and will immediately get onto it. But as a company that uses open source you have no guarantee about the resolution time. So in terms of this, it is much better using Red Hat in that sense. It’s really what our business model is designed around; to give securities and certainties to the customers who want to use open source. Read more

10 Reasons to use open source software defined networking

Software-defined networking (SDN) is emerging as one of the fastest growing segments of open source software (OSS), which in itself is now firmly entrenched in the enterprise IT world. SDN simplifies IT network configuration and management by decoupling control from the physical network infrastructure. Read more