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AMD: Less of an Underdog

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Hardware

Ask any of the top execs at Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) about "the competition," and you'd hear nary a mention of archrival Intel (INTC). Indeed, in public statements at the chipmaker's financial analyst meeting on Nov. 15, Intel came up only once -- and, even then, from a Wall Street type questioning AMD's apparent nonchalance about the potential threat from its giant competitor.

AMD Chief Executive Hector Ruiz has cause for confidence. AMD now controls about 13% of the mainstream server-chip market, about double its percentage of a year ago. It also has made significant inroads with consumers at retail and is beginning to see more interest from corporate and government buyers. "We think we're going to take more business from Intel going forward," Ruiz says in an interview with BusinessWeek Online.

Clearly, AMD is less of an underdog in what looks like the most competitive race among chipmakers since the microprocessor was invented decades ago.

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In related news: Alienware adopts AMD for high-end laptops.

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