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More April Foolishness

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missed one - Wolvix going ubuntu After a lengthy discussion between Oithona and me, we've come to the conclusion that Wolvix is simply too small, fast and stable to be able to compete with the latest installment of Microsoft Windows®. So the decision has been made to move Wolvix over from Slackware to a Ubuntu base using KDE 4.0 as the default desktop environment.

rest here

another missed - Conficker Linux payload For weeks, the media has been hyping the possibility that the infamous Conficker worm was going to do something "spectacular" on April 1. Many Linux longhairs silently hoped that Conficker was poised to forcibly download and install Linux on host computers as part of fiendish plan to upgrade to a better and stronger botnet.

The rumors and speculation, of course, have been a major bust.

"It would make perfect sense," wrote one Slashdot poster. "The bad guys who programmed Conficker are obviously hoping to construct a botnet capable of world domination. Using Linux."

rest here

(Also: Humorix Staff Returns From Lunch Break, Fails To Set World Record)

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