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Compiz 0.9.x - Where are we now, and where to from here

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Software

Compiz 0.9.x started in december when onestone announced his core rewrite on the mailing list. It had features like pluggable output backends, written in c++ (and a few nice interfaces that came with it) and other misc bits and pieces. It was designed mostly in mind to overcome a lot of the design problems we were having, like plugin-plugins and a ridiculous amound of code to manage lists. In Janurary, some developers started to toy around with it and at the beginning of this February, we announced that compiz++ would become the base for the 0.9.x series and the 0.9.x series would features some major reworks. We’ve all been quite busy during that time - so we’ve done whatever possible to push the branch forwards.

Where are we now?

Currently, we are in the process of porting plugins to the 0.9.x branch. If you’ve observing cgit you might see ‘compiz++’ branches pop up in various plugins. This is where all the work is being done. Currently (off the top of my head) we’ve ported quite a number of plugins (about 1/3 of them), with significant ones being scale, switcher, text, mousepoll, wall, expo.

Where to from here?




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