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A great new theme for PCLinuxOS 2009.1

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PCLOS
HowTos
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For those who wish a new theme for their PCLinuxOS 2009.1 desktops, a nice one just showed up in repositories. It features a much softer look than the shipped theme and I'll show you the steps to install it.

1. First open the Synaptic package manager and update your repositories by clicking Reload.





2. Then search for the new theme by clicking and opening the search tool. Type in the name of the new theme: task-bluephase-theme.



3. Right-click the resulting package and Mark for installation.



4. Click Mark again.



5. Then back at the main Synaptic window, click Apply.



6. Confirm by clicking Apply again.



7. After it downloads and installs, open the KDE Control Center by clicking Configure Desktop in your panel quick launcher. Once it opens click Appearance & Themes > Background. Click the little folder icon beside the current background name in the drop-down-list. This will open the wallpaper directory in which you will see the BluePhase.jpg wallpaper. Click on it to highlight it and OK. Then back in the Control Center click Apply.



8. Then look for Splash Screen under the same Appearance & Themes heading. Click on it to open the Splash screen configuration and click on the Bluephase Splash Screen. Click Apply.



9. Still in the KDE Control Center look for and click on System Administation. Under that, click on KDM Theme. Give your root password and click on Bluephase in the list of available themes. Click Apply.



10. You can reboot at this time to check that the new GRUB background and boot-up splash are in place. You should see the new login screen as well as the KDE splash on the way to your new desktop. Notice that you now also have the new KickOff Menu too. You can right click the new Start button to change that back to default menu if desired. And finally, Enjoy your new desktop appearance.






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