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Back up Your Gnome Desktop and Settings

Filed under
Software
HowTos

Neat little tool. Yourgnome allow users to backup all things relative to Gnome on your Linux Machine. Packs everything into a tar.gz into your Home folder. Also includes the tools to extract the tar.gz file so you can restore your Gnome Desktop to a your previous saved state.

I've used it and it works. I used the non GUI version when it first came out. Easy to use. Kudos to Abu Yusuf for taking the time to make it. There are 2 versions. A non GUI version that just runs in terminal. And a 2nd edition that is a GUI Version for people that just want to point and click. These are just some of the things Yourgnome will back up:

rest here




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