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my next computer

desktop
32% (317 votes)
laptop
32% (316 votes)
netbook
24% (240 votes)
smartphone
5% (48 votes)
abacus
7% (69 votes)
Total votes: 990

HP ProLiant ML350 Generation 6 (G6)

http://h18004.www1.hp.com/products/quickspecs/13241_na/13241_na.html

"# Memory:

* 18 DIMM Slots
* Up to 144GB, using PC3-8500R DDR3 Registered (RDIMM) memory, operating at 800MHz when fully populated at 3 DIMMs per Channel in 18 slots
* Up to 24GB, using PC3-10600E DDR3 Unbuffered (UDIMM) memory, operating at 1066MHz when fully populated at 2 DIMMs per Channel in 12 slots"

Actually, I was just joking around for the most part, but yes, one of the newer ML350's is indeed capable of up to 144 GB of ram, using the correct dimms.

My Next Computer - Poll

My next computer will be a netbook with an ARM processor. I am purchasing it for portability.

That said, I would also like to upgrade my abacus. I have a Chinese style Saun Pan with 13 columns. I would like a Japanese style Soroban with more columns. The Saun Pan is good for hexadecimal calculation but I am not (currently) a programmer, so decimal calculation is more appropriate and the extra rows on the Saun Pan can be confusing.

I don't want to spend more than $20 on this project. Like most people I use a calculator when needed. For simple calculation "feeling" the numbers has certain appeal, and it certainly impresses guests when you whip it out to keep score in a game.

Does anyone know where I can pick up a nice Soroban on my $20 budget?

I don't see an option for a

I don't see an option for a server on here.

I have my eye on a "refurbished" HP ML 350 64 gb ram and 3 120 gb sata hot swap hd's. only one dual core amd proc in it now but it can carry 2.

re: Server

Is that 64G of ram a typo - I don't think any ML350 goes past 32G (but I'm not a HP rep nor do I play one on TV so what do I know).

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