Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Kororaa - Close but no cigar...

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

The Kororaa* project released beta 2 of their 2005 Gentoo binary distribution installer this past week and we thought we'd give it a test run. This is a wonderful project and I think it has its niche. I love the idea of getting a gentoo install in a matter of minutes instead of days and in a manner more familiar or comfortable to folks. Kororaa is here fill the desire to install gentoo quickly and then later rebuild packages to your machine. In other words, the best of both worlds.

Also before I forget I should mention that the developers also offer a sister product called "Gororaa" that features a gnome desktop as opposed to KDE. They also offer versions for the 64-bit architecture as well.

The site states, "Other new features include lightweight window manager options, international keyboard language support, package selection, updated setup menus, as well as various new tools and configuration scripts and a prettier installer with progress bars Smile KDE 3.4.3, Gnome 2.12, OpenOffice 2.0 and other carefully selected apps for everyday use are among the goodies that are included."

For those who are going to try this distro, I found these "handy tools" listed in the documentation:

systemconfig (the main configuration menu you see when you first boot)
genuser --simple (this command adds a user to your system)
genpass (generates a decent Linux password ? good!)
gensetpass (reset a user's password)
chooseres (set your preferred resolutions in X)
choosekeymap (set your keyboard language)

Also while I'm stalling waiting for my cdrs to burn, I found this nice page that lists many of the packages included in the packages iso. HERE a changelog of sorts as well.

Installation

The installer boots up a nice "sorta" graphical environment, what I like to call ascii-graphical. Smile It walks you through the install process with relative ease.

It begins at a prompt with the text message giving you instructions to type one of several options. I recall seeing:
*kororaa
*kororaa-64
*Don't forget to play a little moon-buggy if you get bored! Wink

I chose kororaa and it began. First choose a keyboard map, Configure drives, and begin install. In configure drives, one can repartition, set mount points, and format. Begin install extracts the now default gentoo stage 3 tarball. Then one is asked to change to the "packages-cd."

At the next screen one can:

  1. Set date

  2. Set timezone
  3. Hostname & domainname
  4. Package selection
  5. Install packages
  6. Configure boot services
  7. Configure boot loader
  8. Setup Users
  9. Finished!

The package selection might be somewhat sparse in some folks' options, but not too bad in mine. It lists many useful applications under all the major categories. It seems to install and finish up.

Then it's time to do some configuration. Under the configure boot services, one checks the services they will need to start upon boot. Grub is the only choice for the bootloader. Finally one is prompted to set the root password and set up a user(s).

One is given two choices when setting up their user accounts. One option is simple, that allows one to input username and password. The other option is complex, where one can set up all the options, including the uid, groups, home and shell.

When one clicks Finish!, I assume it'd be time to setup X. Instead I got the error: can't find mkxfsetup.

System

Upon reboot, one is presented with a configuration dialog that again has some options that don't work (or didn't for me). The layout is similar to the following:

  1. Setup Sound

  2. Setup Sensors
  3. Resolution setup
  4. Network
  5. Portage Mirror
  6. Sync Portage Tree
  7. Update Locate database
  8. Prelink System
  9. Finished!

The setup sound and sensors didn't work here complaining it couldn't find the config files. Resolution worked as did network, portage mirror & sync, and Update Locate database. Prelinking said it worked, but I'm sure it didn't.

It turns out the problems I was experiencing were the result of the package installation step bombing out at an early point. I did several burns and new installations in an attempt to get the system to install as the developers intended, however in each instance the package installation just stops at about 18 of 269. This leaves one with a very crippled desktop. In fact, no desktop and very little applications were installed at all.

At this point one does have a basic base system with users and root privileges. Portage is functional and a make.conf is in place. The graphical setups that do work can help the newcomer get that base system installed much easier than downloading the stage-3 tarball and starting there.

So, although your system is not what it was advertised to be, one could finish their installation after boot through portage. emerge mkxfsetup gets one the utility to set up X, and emerge kde-meta would probably grind away for hours eventually leading to a kde desktop. However, that's not the promise or purpose of kororaa.

Kororaa was said to be a binary distribution with a kde desktop from which one could re-build their customized source based system. One can accomplish a complete system, just not at leisure from the luxury of kde.

This is a beta product at this time and the installer shows great promise. Perhaps my experience is isolated, but it appears at this time we need to let Kororaa simmer a bit more before it's done.

So, close but no cigar folks.

UPDATE: Please see my updated article concerning Kororaa Linux.

Try default install?

Hey cool Smile I just saw this review on distrowatch and thought I'd check it out.

I'm sorry it didn't work out for you - something has gone wrong in the package install, which is strange. I would really love to see the output of /var/log/emerge.log to see what failed. Maybe there is a bug in the package selection that I hadn't found.

Kororaa should definately give you a full KDE install. Obviously with the install failing at package 19 you have 250 packages that never got to be installed, hence it is rather lacking.

I would really love to see how the install goes without changing the default packages. Keen to give that a try? Wink

Cheers,
Chris

re: Try default install?

I de-selected the wifi drivers, ipw2200, synaptics, wpa supplicant, and kwifimanager.

Yeah, I can try the default install tomorrow. I can email you the emerge.log from the unsuccessful install tonight.

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

re: Try default install?

Sorry. It still won't go here. I had to re-download the files, so I started with fresh download, fresh burns and formatted the partition using reiserfs (3). I didn't change any default package settings, in fact I didn't even open the subcatagories.

It made it to 103 of 337. Sad I'm sorry. Perhaps it's something up with my machine.

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Something's not right..

Something is definately not right there Thinking perhaps it's a flakey CD drive, I'm not sure. Some tests might be in order Wink One thought though, one cannot run other emerge commands from the system while the packages are installing. The percentage bar uses the emerge.log, and if you run other emerge commands (even queries) it will add these to the emerge.log and hence interfere with the bar. The packages will still be installing, but most likely it will say "finished installing packages" because it looks for the "Finished" from the log. But as discussed on email, the system should install just fine and you should get a pretty KDM login screen waiting for you after your initial boot Smile

re: Something's not right...

>One cannot run other emerge commands from the system while the packages are installing. The percentage bar uses the emerge.log, and if you run other emerge commands (even queries) it will add these to the emerge.log.

I didn't touch anything. In fact, I walked away and watched tv until I heard the "drums" stop. Smile

Yeah, I'm sure it would do fine on other's machines. I wish my other test machine wasn't down. Sad Although the first failure was using my dvd rom and the rest were using my cdrw. So I know that don't rule out the drives completely, but it does make it less likely it's that. And I used different media brands each burn too.

Anyway, wonderful project! And good work, the installer looks great.
----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

re: install requirements?

When I test a new distribution I usually, and in this case, only define a /. I don't even tell them about my /boot partition. That's mainly to protect my data, but it also simplifies things. I don't even use separate /opt or /usr whatever on my main system.

As far as installing some script to take screenshots - hey point me to that huh? Big Grin Seriously, if I get any, it's been thru an emulator either before or after the actual review from my main system. I've looked and asked around, but never did get a good answer on how to get screenshots like some do of the actual install and such. I knew there had to be a way, I just hadn't found it yet.

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

no requirements :) apart from a computer!

hey atang1, there are no restrictions on hard drive setup or anything under Kororaa (that I'm aware of). The installer just detects what you have and presents it for you to do what you will Smile
I used vmware to take all the screenshots from beta2 at the screenshots section of the website Smile

Re: Two questions for the distro architect ?

Hey atang1, I'm not sure how you mean to get the distro to fall back to compatible drivers. The X detection script (based on knoppix) will detect vesa if it doesn't know the chipset of the video card. As for modems and parallel ports etc, Kororaa has support forn whatever the 2.6.13 kernel supports, and for sound the alsaconf script should also detect them. I guess what you are suggesting is that is no sound is detected, then it should default to sbpro, but if the card is sbpro compatible is should already be set up. Perhaps I'm missing the mark here, if so, please enlighten me Wink In short it should work on any computer (provided it has full sse instruction set support) Smile Cheers

This is rather interesting an

This is rather interesting and something I don't have much clue about! Thinking It is probably something the Gentoo devs can look into. Kororaa itself is really a customised Gentoo install with our own installer, configuration scripts and pre-built packages, etc. This stuff is a little over my head! Do you have more info on this subject? Cheers.

Re: We need you and other distro developers ?

atang1 wrote:

As you can tell Tuxmachines.org is the place for distro developers to gether and discuss the future of Linux operating system. You are welcome to do your own review here of your own distro.

I'm gonna have to put you on the payroll atang! Big Grin well, ...if I had a payroll...

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Tizen News

OSS Leftovers

  • How Open Source Tech Helps Feds Solve Workforce Turnover Issues
    Just as a mainframe from decades ago might be ready for retirement, the IT staff who originally procured and installed that system might also be preparing for a new phase in their lives. It’s up to the current and next generation of government IT employees to prepare for that eventuality, but there are indications they may not be ready, despite evidence that older IT professionals are retiring or will soon be leaving their positions. Unfortunately, a skills gap exists even among younger generation IT workers. Agencies are scrambling to find personnel with expertise in cloud service management, cybersecurity, technical architecture and legacy technologies, such as common business-oriented language (COBOL) and mainframes, among other areas. At the same time that many workers are getting ready to retire, leaving behind a wealth of knowledge, many younger IT professionals are struggling to gain the knowledge they will need to take their agencies into the future.
  • Introducing Fn: “Serverless must be open, community-driven, and cloud-neutral”
    Fn, a new serverless open source project was announced at this year’s JavaOne. There’s no risk of cloud lock-in and you can write functions in your favorite programming language. “You can make anything, including existing libraries, into a function by packaging it in a Docker container.” We invited Bob Quillin, VP for the Oracle Container Group to talk about Fn, its best features, next milestones and more.
  • Debian seminar in Yokohama, 2017/11/18
    I had attended to Tokyo area debian seminar #157. The day’s special guest is Chris Lamb, the Debian Project Leader in 2017. He had attended to Open Compliance Summit, so we invited him as our guest.
  • Overclock Labs bets on Kubernetes to help companies automate their cloud infrastructure
    Overclock Labs wants to make it easier for developers to deploy and manage their applications across clouds. To do so, the company is building tools to automate distributed cloud infrastructure and, unsurprisingly, it is betting on containers — and specifically the Kubernetes container orchestration tools — to do this. Today, Overclock Labs, which was founded two years ago, is coming out of stealth and announcing that it raised a $1.3 million seed round from a number of Silicon Valley angel investors and CrunchFund — the fund that shares a bit of its name and history with TechCrunch but is otherwise completely unaffiliated with the blog you are currently reading.
  • MariaDB Energizes the Data Warehouse with Open Source Analytics Solution
    MariaDB® Corporation, the company behind the fastest growing open source database, today announced new product enhancements to MariaDB AX, delivering a modern approach to data warehousing that enables customers to easily perform fast and scalable analytics with better price performance over proprietary solutions. MariaDB AX expands the highly successful MariaDB Server, creating a solution that enables high performance analytics with distributed storage and parallel processing, and that scales with existing commodity hardware on premises or across any cloud platform. With MariaDB AX, data across every facet of the business is transformed into meaningful and actionable results.
  • AT&T Wants White Box Routers with an Open Operating System [Ed: AT&T wants to openwash its surveillance equipment]
    AT&T says it’s not enough to deploy white box hardware and to orchestrate its networks with the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) software. “Each individual machine also needs its own operating system,” writes Chris Rice, senior vice president of AT&T Labs, Domain 2.0 Architecture, in a blog post. To that end, AT&T announced its newest effort — the Open Architecture for a Disaggregated Network Operating System (dNOS).
  • Intel Lands Support For Vector Neural Network Instructions In LLVM
  • p2k17 Hackathon report: Antoine Jacoutot on ports+packages progress
  • GCC 8 Feature Development Is Over
    Feature development on the GCC 8 compiler is over with it now entering stage three of its development process. SUSE's Richard Biener announced minutes ago that GCC 8 entered stage three development, meaning only general bug fixing and documentation updates are permitted.
  • 2018 Is The Year For Open Source Software For The Pentagon
  • Open-source defenders turn on each other in 'bizarre' trademark fight sparked by GPL fall out
    Two organizations founded to help and support developers of free and open-source software have locked horns in public, betraying a long-running quarrel rumbling mostly behind the scenes. On one side, the Software Freedom Law Center, which today seeks to resolve licensing disputes amicably. On the other, the Software Freedom Conservancy, which takes a relatively harder line against the noncompliance of licensing terms. The battleground: the, er, US Patent and Trademark Office. The law center has demanded the cancellation of a trademark held by the conservancy.
  • Open Source Underwater Glider: An Interview with Alex Williams, Grand Prize Winner
    Alex Williams pulled off an incredible engineering project. He developed an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) which uses a buoyancy engine rather than propellers as its propulsion mechanism and made the entire project Open Source and Open Hardware.

Programming Leftovers

Security: Linux, Free Software Principles, Microsoft and Intel

  • Some 'security people are f*cking morons' says Linus Torvalds
    Linux overlord Linus Torvalds has offered some very choice words about different approaches security, during a discussion about whitelisting features proposed for version 4.15 of the Linux kernel. Torvalds' ire was directed at open software aficionado and member of Google's Pixel security team Kees Cook, who he has previously accused of idiocy. Cook earned this round of shoutiness after he posted a request to “Please pull these hardened usercopy changes for v4.15-rc1.”
  • Free Software Principles
    Ten thousand dollars is more than $3,000, so the motives don't add up for me. Hutchins may or may not have written some code, and that code may or may not have been used to commit a crime. Tech-literate people, such as the readers of Linux Magazine, understand the difference between creating a work and using it to commit a crime, but most of the media coverage – in the UK, at least – has been desperate to follow the paradigm of building a man up only to gleefully knock him down. Even his achievement of stopping WannaCry is decried as "accidental," a word full of self-deprecating charm when used by Hutchins, but which simply sounds malicious in the hands of the Daily Mail and The Telegraph.
  • New warning over back door in Linux
    Researchers working at Russian cyber security firm Dr Web claim to have found a new vulnerability that enables remote attackers to crack Linux installations virtually unnoticed. According to the anti-malware company, cyber criminals are getting into the popular open-source operating system via a new backdoor. This, they say, is "indirect evidence" that cyber criminals are showing an increasing interest in targeting Linux and the applications it powers. The trojan, which it's calling Linux.BackDoor.Hook.1, targets the library libz primarily. It offers compression and extraction capabilities for a plethora of Linux-based programmes.
  • IN CHATLOGS, CELEBRATED HACKER AND ACTIVIST CONFESSES COUNTLESS SEXUAL ASSAULTS
  • Bipartisan Harvard panel recommends hacking [sic] safeguards for elections
     

    The guidelines are intended to reduce risks in low-budget local races as well as the high-stakes Congressional midterm contests next year. Though most of the suggestions cost little or nothing to implement and will strike security professionals as common sense, notorious attacks including the leak of the emails of Hillary Clinton’s campaign chair, John Podesta, have succeeded because basic security practices were not followed.  

  • Intel Chip Flaws Leave Millions of Devices Exposed
     

    On Monday, the chipmaker released a security advisory that lists new vulnerabilities in ME, as well as bugs in the remote server management tool Server Platform Services, and Intel’s hardware authentication tool Trusted Execution Engine. Intel found the vulnerabilities after conducting a security audit spurred by recent research. It has also published a Detection Tool so Windows and Linux administrators can check their systems to see if they're exposed.