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Lenovo Analyst: Linux on Netbooks Is Doomed

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Linux

Because it's only proper to give credit where it's due, Matt Kohut, Worldwide Competitive Analyst for Lenovo, could be spot on in his prediction that Linux will remain a niche market on netbooks. Heck, netbooks could be called a niche market -- I guess it would all come down to how you define and apply "niche" in given areas.

Usually, when someone (particularly an industry analyst) puts forth such a prediction, it is followed by the reasoning that drew him to such a conclusion. Kohut explained his theory to TECH.BLORGE, highlighting a few issues Linux grapples with today, and many, many more that were laid to rest years ago.

I have to say a few words in Kohut's defense. The TECH.BLORGE interview seems less a flow of conversation, and more a collection of sound bytes.

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Why Lenovo Sucks at Linux

I had to read this story Lenovo analyst: Linux on netbooks is doomed" several times because I couldn't quite believe what I was reading. Was this really Lenovo's Worldwide Competitive Analyst saying things like "You have to know how to decompile codes and upload data"? Really?

I wrote to both the interview author, John Pospisil, and to Matt Kohut, Lenovo's Worldwide Competitive Analyst, asking if Mr. Kohut had been accurately quoted. I haven't heard back yet, but then it's just been a couple of hours. So I searched for other articles about Mr. Kohut, and found some interesting nuggets.

Sounds like a fun job. I think this bio would be more accurate if it said "...knows a few things about Lenovo computers and Windows software."

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