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Aaron Seigo Talks About KDE's Past and Future

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KDE
Interviews

Aaron Seigo is one of the most public faces of the KDE desktop. Not only is he a long-time developer, but, for the past three years, he has been president of KDE e.V., the German non-profit that handles the project's financial and legal affairs.

He is also an articulate blogger and public speaker who combines thoughtfulness with brash outspokenness. This last weekend, I finally met him face to face at COSSFest in Calgary. Now nearing the end of his time as president, he talked about KDE's recent past and near future, and his role in both.

As he looks forward to stepping down as president and refocusing on his development interests, Seigo is far more interested in talking about what has been accomplished during the last three years. He mentions the introduction of a code of conduct for interaction within the community and an upcoming membership drive for individuals. But what he is most pleased about is the increased transparency and the institutionalizing of developer sprints within the project.

"When I stepped in, the board people were very busy people," he recalls. "They spent their time getting things done, as opposed to helping people understand what was getting done. And there was a certain decrease in interaction and trust that occurs when you do that."

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