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Open source VS proprietary support

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OSS

One of the biggest arguments people try to use against Open source programs is the supposed lack of support. In general I have found that support for open source programs is equal to and ofttimes better than that provided by proprietary companies. I am not targeting the company that everyone loves to hate either. I am talking (writing) in a general sense.

When I have had problems with proprietary programs and tried to get support for those problems, I have found some to be impossible to get support for. Some I have managed to get support for but it takes a long time and some have been very helpful indeed. To the extent that they connected remotely to our systems and fixed the problem. Of course this level of support required the moving around of numbers in bank accounts. Most of the time I manage to at least get an answer of wont fix by looking through their knowledge bases. In all of these cases I have never managed to contact and speak (write) directly with the developers. There has always been a chain of people in between me and the people who actually fix the problems.

The situation is extremely similar with open source software.




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