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Why I Use Linux

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Linux

I am not a programmer. Yet Linux is built on the philosophical principle of freely sharing source code. This is how those who create Linux frequently advocate it.

But if I'm not a programmer, and source code therefore means little to me, why do I use Linux? Why do I spend much of my time suggesting others use it? Is it just because it's available fore free? (Spoiler: No.) These are interesting questions that are not discussed very often.

I list my personal reasons for using Linux below. Some are downright practical, while others are more philosophical.

Control over my system

I have the freedom to do what I want with Linux. Crucially, there's no "right way" or "wrong way" of doing things (although there are sensible and efficient ways of doing things, of course). In the Linux community, you'll never hear somebody say, "Hey! You're not supposed to do that!" or, "Serves you right for doing it the wrong way!" Instead, what you're more likely to hear is, "Hey! I didn't know you could do that! That's cool!" Innovative solutions are encouraged. Feel free to explore.

This freedom extends to my choice of software too. If I don't like a particular piece of software, I can use an alternative.

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