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Group test: project planners

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Computer-based project management and planning (PM for short) is a strange beast. Real geeks love to hate it: "What planning and deadlines? We'll release when it's ready!" PM, however, is vital in all large organisations and remains one of the reasons that keeps many desktop users locked into their old proprietary operating system - Microsoft Project does after all, run only on Microsoft Windows.

Don't despair, however. If you were suffering in silence because you thought you couldn't draw a Gantt chart or an RBS diagram on Linux, you were wrong. In this article we'll present five project managers that are aimed at non-geek desktop users. They're all programs that can work without an internet connection or relying on external servers, so their installation is really easy, even if they aren't already included in your preferred Linux distro.


GanttProject is a multiplatform Java program with a nice, clean interface centred around generation and display of Gantt charts. This is also the most cosmopolitan program reviewed in this article: the user interface is already available in about 20 languages.

In the main window you can enter tasks and arrange their hierarchy by 'indenting' or 'outdenting' them – that is, clicking the corresponding entries in the drop-down menu.

rest here

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