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Kernel Log: What's coming in 2.6.30 - File systems

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Linux

The patches adopted in Linux 2.6.30 introduce many significant changes affecting data security and Ext3 and Ext4 performance. Support for the EXOFS and NILFS2 file systems is new, as is the cache for the AFS and NFS network file systems. There are also a few fixes for the almost forgotten ReiserFS file system.

Released mid-week, as is normal for the second phase of the development cycle, the third pre-release version of Linux 2.6.30 included mostly minor enhancements and fixes, although there were two code restructures.

The interminable discussions of the Ext3 and Ext4 file systems and the way they interact with other kernel subsystems have largely subsided. The H Open has reported on the early stages of these discussions – the occasionally abrasive discussion on the LKML (Linux Kernel Mailing List) continued for a further week, with a total of 650 emails, not counting other threads triggered by the discussion.

The debate has been far from fruitless and has led to the development of various modifications which Torvalds has integrated, in some cases immediately, into the main development tree leading to Linux 2.6.30. This part of the "What's coming in 2.6.30" Kernel Log series gives an overview of these and many other changes to the code for the various file systems supported by Linux.

rest here




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