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ASRock X58 SuperComputer

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Hardware

As we have noted before, ASRock continues to step up the capabilities of their products and with each new iteration of motherboards we see more feature-rich, enthusiast-oriented products from this cost-oriented company. With the current global economy, more consumers will be looking for more cost effective products, which places ASRock in a prime position. One of the cheapest Intel X58 motherboards on the market is the ASRock X58 SuperComputer, which has a number of exciting features but at a lower cost. In this article today we are seeing how well the ASRock X58 SuperComputer runs with Linux.
Features:

CPU
- Intel Socket 1366 Core i7 Processor Extreme Edition / Core i7 Processor
- Supports Intel Dynamic Speed Technology
- System Bus up to 6400 MT/s; Intel QuickPath Interconnect
- Supports Hyper-Threading Technology
- Supports Untied Overclocking Technology
- Supports EM64T CPU

Chipset
- Northbridge: Intel X58
- Southbridge: Intel ICH10R

Memory
- Triple Channel DDR3 memory technology
- 6 x DDR3 DIMM slots
- Supports DDR3 2000(OC)/1866(OC)/1600(OC)/1333(OC)/1066 non-ECC, un-buffered memory
- Supports DDR3 ECC, un-buffered memory with Intel Workstation 1S Xeon processors 3500 series
- Max. capacity of system memory: 24GB
- Supports Intel Extreme Memory Profile (XMP)

LAN
- PCIE x1 Gigabit LAN 10/100/1000 Mb/s
- Realtek RTL8111DL
- Supports Wake-On-LAN
- Supports Dual GLAN with Teaming function

rest here




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