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First Look At Mandriva 2006

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Mandriva, ohhh Mandriva how do we love you. Let us count the ways. It's all been said before hasn't it? Mandriva has been well loved by the Linux community from day one and I'd be a liar if I said I'd never gazed upon it's polished desktop with the utmost respect and appreciation for the work their developers put into their product. Mandriva (the artist formerly known as Mandrake) has always been about the desktop. Sure, they've got their enterprise products just like any other major Linux software developer, but from this author's armchair, it sure would seem their heart and soul is rooted deeply in the Linux desktop... and there's nothing wrong with that. Their French heritage shows in their passion for excellence and it hasn't gone unnoticed. After all, somebody has got to make sure the Linux desktop is on a constant upswing, right?

Although many might not see the difference, corporations such as Mandriva, Novell/SUSE, and Linspire strive to understand and cater to the lowest common denominator: the average consumer. Almost every other distribution available is a "geek only" thing no matter how hard we try to convince ourselves otherwise. They are so far disconnected from what end users actually need and want that it's almost impossible to push it any further than a niche group of people. There's nothing wrong with this I suppose. It's just the way it is and that's all find and good with me, but when it comes to promoting the desktop to a wider audience outside of the already established Linux community and early adopters... you need focus. This is what Mandriva is all about. Love them or hate them, they have a goal and are doing their best to achieve it.

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