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The Linux-Windows Warriors Get Better Weapons

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You can crab all you want about vendor-sponsored research, such as the many studies that Microsoft has sponsored directly or endorsed as it tries to fight off the onslaught of Linux, but it does one very practical thing. The heated competition and even more heated words are, of course, amusing, but the truth is, the analytical weapons that the Windows allies and the Linux allies are deploying are getting more sophisticated. And this is a good thing for customers, even if it makes life difficult for commercial Linux distributors and Microsoft.

The latest interesting report in a volley of whitepapers coming out of the consultancy community at the behest of Microsoft comes from Security Innovation. Its report, called "Reliability: Analyzing Solution Uptime as Business Needs Change," is undeniably clever, which is one reason why Microsoft is paying for the study and touting it so much.

By not saying what this key software was, the comparison is called into question.

Suffice it to say, I think that Security Innovation has brought up a very interesting point, and an intriguing methodology. But it needs to be made a little more transparent about the details and a lot more fair in its comparison.

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