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Up to 24 percent of software purchases now open source

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Open source has become big business, suggests an article in the Investors Business Daily, but it has done so by becoming more like the proprietary-software world it purports to leave behind.

The article cites recent research from IDC indicating that CIOs allocated up to 24 percent of their budgets to open-source software in 2008, up from 10 percent in 2007--a finding that jibes with recent data from Forrester. This open-source growth is propelling Red Hat to grow "at two to three times the rate of the broader software industry over a multiyear horizon," according to research from Piper Jaffray.

Red Hat is an example of "free done right," following analysis from TechDirt. We've moved beyond the business models that insist that every line of software be open source: they couldn't scale and tended to treat openness as an end in and of itself, rather than as a means to an end.

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