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Slackware 12.1

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Slack

Slackware has been a Linux distro I’ve never really been interested in. It is the oldest distro still going and really did show it in my opinion. It was difficult to use, unfriendly and fairly slow.

Therefore, I was not expecting much from the new release, which has been out for a while. Still, I downloaded the DVD off the website and installed it on a virtual machine. The installer has never changed, still being pretty difficult to use, more so than the FreeBSD installer, and it still requires use of fdisk (a command line paritioning utility) rather than having a graphical one.

To start with the installer would not pick up the CD and kept giving an error, but a reboot solved that problem and I check the option to install everything on the DVD.

rest here




Slackware is fairly slow?

First time to hear that.

BTW, 12.2 has been out for awhile.

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