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My good ol’ friend PC-BSD 7.1

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While I continue to use GNU/Linux, I still hold an emotional tie to BSD-based operating systems. It was not until recently that I had decided to give the latest version of PC-BSD a try. This is version 7.1: Galileo Edition. A side note: PC-BSD is a desktop oriented version of FreeBSD intended to be extremely user friendly, primarily because of their implementation of their PBI package management system along with other features.


So I downloaded and began the installation of PC-BSD. The installation process was fairly quick and very simple. I am not complaining when I say this but I was a bit surprised to find the generic FreeBSD (actually PC-BSD) text only boot screen asking for the user to initiate the Default installer or any of the other options (which includes starting the installer with the experimental ZFS support). When I select the Default or when the boot screen times out to the Default, all components are loaded into memory and X loads into the graphical portion of the installation process. It is the same thing for the boot loader after the OS has been installed.


The default graphical environment for this distribution is KDE 4.x.

rest here

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