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Netbooks & Moblin

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Linux
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I recently downloaded the latest live image of Moblin. It’s pretty slick. Runs fine on my Acer Aspire One booting from the USB drive.

Moblin has a lot of potential, but there are still some bugs. I can’t find any good documentation about installing it to the hard drive, and if the install is anything like the USB install, I’m wary of accidentally blowing away my WinXP & restore partitions. But one of the biggest problems I found is that there seems to be no intuitive software shutdown/suspend function. Hitting the power button does trigger a normal software shutdown, which is good.

Currently, my Aspire ONE is dual boot WinXP and Mandriva 2009.1 Spring. Mandriva runs pretty flawlessly and boots FAST. This is the FULL version of Mandriva Free and not some stripped down or dumbed down version.

rest here




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OpenStack Roundup

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Ubuntu 16.04 vs. vs. Clear Linux vs. openSUSE vs. Scientific Linux 7

Here are some extra Linux distribution benchmarks for your viewing pleasure this weekend. Following the release of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS last week, I was running another fresh performance comparison of various Linux distributions on my powerful Xeon E3-1270 v5 Skylake system. I made it a few Linux distributions in before the motherboard faced an untimely death. Not sure of the cause yet, but the motherboard is kaput and thus the testing was ended prematurely. Read more