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OpenSource Software Bounty Hunters

Let's all pitch in and make a list of the top ten apps/programs that are most needed for Linux/OpenSource and then everyone find a way to drop some cash into the hat. We'll use the cash to offer a 'bounty' for the programmer(s) who submit a working, usable solution for one of the top ten list.

We'll talk to the "Big Boys" out there and try to get them to participate as well. The more cash we put in the hat, the bigger the bounty we can offer.

This is done in science with the "X Prize", why can't we do it with software too?

If "Software Bounty Hunters" could put together even a couple thousand dollars, that might be enough to catch the interest of some of these wayward and bored programmers looking for a little scratch cash.

Heck, once the ball got rolling,the app could be made an OpenSource project in it's own right or maybe taken in by one of the "Big Boys" Like Novell, IBM, RedHat, who knows and added to their 'paid' roles for development. They do it all the time, buy up a little guys project because it beats out anything the Big boys can put out. Why innovate when you have the money to buy it? Right?

The winning entries to claim the cash would have to be tested and proven first. Make sure it meets GPL and all other legal gobbledygook standards.

It could be like "Americas Most Wanted" except it would be "OpenSources Most Wanted", and you can claim the reward for turning in the best software.

How much do we want new software, especially software we all say Linux/OpenSource needs but no one is actively developing it because no one is showing the green?

I would pony up for something like this, think if 200 people put up $10.00 each. We have a viable cash reward of $2,000 off the bat.

If more than 200 people put up $10 or more on an ongoing basis, we could build an ongoing sustained "bounty" base for new and upcoming challengers.

Something to think about anyway huh?

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Isn't that Google's Summer of Code?

I don't know the details, whether accepted applicants are paid or not, but isn't that along the lines of Google's "Summer of Code" project each year?

Or, I think you are suggesting a challenge such as "make a program that does X" and have a pot of money for the first person to build one (and meets specifications and usability)?

What will happen regarding support afterward? It's easier to build a program that does something, but to build a program that does something AND can be maintained without re-writing each time is slightly different.

I like the idea, though! Might even be able to get the big-boys to pitch in money (no strings attached of course).

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Linux means Freedom, problem is most users don't know what it is, or how to use it.

summer of code

is a time limited session for development.

This is a year round thing that will be open to anyone who wants to code.

As for what happens afterward, well, if it's a solid apps and it works well in a niche that people respond well to, then I can see it being picked up by a big boy or a project of people coming to support it as many others have done in the past.

re: Bounty

Bounties never work. Mainly because the bounties never add up to more then pocket change - therefore you're always getting the equivalent to the lowest bidder working on the cheapest solution.

I agree, that does happen alot.

But, I have seen things come together when no one expected them to also.

I just think it's worth a shot with a well organized group and a coordinated effort.

re: Optimists

Optimists - they're like the guy who keeps trying to pound in the finishing nail with a 20 lb sledge (cause ya know, it will just take a "tap" that way) - it will never happen - but boy does it feel so good when they finally stop.

So good luck on the bounty project - I'm sure it's just a case of 5,392,843rd times the charm.

optimism - idealism

it's what OpenSource and Linux are partly about.

Doing things the way they 'could' be, 'should' be done.

It's about setting goals and looking for the best in others.

Sure, there are a lot of pessimistic people who have had life kick them in the rear one too many times to be comfortable with looking on the bright side of things, but that doesn't mean people should stop trying to do better.

it just means we have to accept that there are some folks who who too self absorbed to be concerned about the group as a whole and people like that will have to be accounted for in the whole works.

and, really, thanks for the good wish, now all we need are the good people who believe it can happen if they put their minds to it.

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