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Preston Gralla: Why you Shouldn’t Care

In this weeks Computerworld opinion column “Desktop Linux: Why you Shouln’t Care” Preston Gralla (who?) bashes Linux for no apparent reason other than to bash something he obviously knows nothing about.

I’ve never heard of this guy before so I checked out the rest of his blog post, and to my surprise (note the sarcasm) yep he loves his Microsoft. It’s fine to love your operating system of choice but it’s another thing to spread out right lies about the operating system you choose not to use.

He tries to make the point that Linux use, as measured by Net Applications has crossed the 1% market share barrier as insignificant, really then why do you talk about it all the time. You mention it in your Computerworld article and in numerous blog post. Sounds like that 1% sure caught your attention.

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Preston Gralla: Why you Shouldn’t Cite, Either

There are quite a few reporters in IDG (also ZDNet) who write about Linux despite not using it. That would be the equivalent of srlinuxx writing about how Macs suck. It's not appropriate. Preston Gralla is to Linux what Rob Enderle is to Linux. It is valuable to put one's effort fueling thw writings of those who actually use Linux and write about it, not those who provoke to defend their personal interests (Gralla sells Windows books, so his agenda aligns with his pocket).

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