Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Breathing Life Into Older Computers

Filed under
HowTos

Many of the readers who visit here surely have an older computer that has been tossed away in a closet. Take a look at my systems. The oldest computer I have is a Pentium 266 MMX laptop with 64MB of RAM. Most people would just consider this to be garbage and junk it, and if you brought this in for service where I work, I would agree with you. While this laptop might seem old and out-of-date now, it is small and light. I needed something I could easily carry around, so I figured I would see what I could salvage out of this dinosaur. Windows would have a hard time running on this low-spec laptop, but there are many distributions of Linux that will work exceptionally well. The one we'll be using today is Damn Small Linux.

Full Article.

Lost Reality

Recycling crap is a fine hobby, but people, lets get real, junk = junk no matter what you do with it. All of these "I made xxx do yyy" articles assumes one thing - that your time is worthless. When you can get a brand new system for a few hundred dollars, why would anyone waste their time trying to resurrect ancient crap that will at best, limp along with marginal performance? Time moves on, and I'm amazed that some people find that a hard concept to grasp (buggy whip grease anyone?).

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux Desktop Security

  • How to Safely and Securely Back Up Your Linux Workstation
    Even seasoned system administrators can overlook Linux workstation backups or do them in a haphazard, unsafe manner. At a minimum, you should set up encrypted workstation backups to external storage. But it’s also nice to use zero-knowledge backup tools for off-site/cloud backups for more peace of mind. Let’s explore each of these methods in more depth. You can also download the entire set of recommendations as a handy guide and checklist.
  • Google zero-trust security framework goes beyond passwords
    With a sprawling workforce, a wide range of devices running on multiple platforms, and a growing reliance on cloud infrastructure and applications, the idea of the corporate network as the castle and security defenses as walls and moats protecting the perimeter doesn’t really work anymore. Which is why, over the past year, Google has been talking about BeyondCorp, the zero-trust perimeter-less security framework it uses to secure access for its 61,000 employees and their devices.

Leftovers: Gaming

SystemD and Linux (Kernel)

  • systemd ❤ meson
    After hearing good things about meson for a long time, I decided to take the plunge and started working on porting the build system of systemd to meson. In our case "build system" is really a system — 11.5k lines in configure.ac and two Makefile.am s. This undertaking was bigger than I expected. Even though I had the initial patch compiling most of the code after a weekend of work, it took another three weeks and 80 patches [1] to bring it to mergeable state. There are still minor issues outstanding, but the pull request has been merged, so I want to take the opportunity to celebrate and summarize my impressions about meson.
  • Systemd Lands Meson Build System Support
    Systemd can now be built with the Meson build system as an alternative to its traditional Make support.
  • Another Stable Update Released for the Linux 3.18 Kernel, Adds Many Improvements
    One day after announcing the release of the Linux 4.10.12, 4.9.24, and 4.4.63 kernels, Greg Kroah-Hartman informed the community about the availability of yet another maintenance update to the Linux 3.18 kernel series.
  • Kernel Developers Still Discussing Raising Linux's Compiler Requirements
    Linux kernel developers are still looking to raise the requirements of GCC for building the Linux kernel. It turns out some developers are still using GCC 4.1 for building the mainline Linux kernel, largely for MIPS and other niche architectures. Plus some developers still are using older GCC compiler releases for allegedly better compiler warnings. But at least in 2017 it's looking like there's some agreement on beginning to mandate later GCC 4.x compilers as a minimum for being able to build newer kernel releases.

Trying Out Nouveau's Accelerated Pascal Support With DRM-Next, Mesa 17.2-dev

One of the many features to look forward to with Linux 4.12 is the Nouveau DRM driver providing initial 3D/accelerated support for GeForce GTX 1050/1060/1070/1080 "Pascal" graphics cards. Here are some benchmarks of this open-source NVIDIA driver support for these latest-generation GPUs compared to the proprietary driver. Read more