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Web development made easy with Bluefish and KompoZer

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Software

Building a website? Don't know where to start? Let me help you.

Creating websites from scratch is a serious business. You need to have an idea. You need to have a design. And you need tools to build the sites with. Then, you need to be familiar with HTML, the language of the web, before you can actually start working.

Not necessarily. It is possible to build reasonable websites without being a master in HTML, XHTML, CSS, or other related languages. While it definitely helps to be proficient in at least one of these, you can start with nothing more than a handful of enthusiasm.

To this end, people use HTML editors. These are web-building programs that automatically wrap free text in relevant code, sparing writers the need to dabble in technical details and lets them focus on content.

In this article, I'm going to present a pair of such HTML editors, which you can use to build your websites. Both fall into the category of What You See Is What You Get (WYSIWYG), meaning that they allow you to see what the final product should look like instantly, in real time, without long, complex compilations or conversions.

The two candidates are KompoZer and Bluefish.




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